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Is it possible to limit the number of members in an array, like LIMIT in MySQL? For instance, if I have $array with x members, and I only want to return the first 50 of them, how do I do that?

Should I use a combination of count() and array_slice(), or is there a simpler way?

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I assume you mean array_slice(), rather than array_splice(); and count() shouldn't be necessary –  Mark Baker Jul 27 '12 at 14:51
    
Thanks - Corrected array_slice(). –  Alfo Jul 27 '12 at 15:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Using array_slice should do the trick.

array_slice($array, 0, 50); // same as offset 0 limit 50 in sql
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Yes, don't use splice, because that will modify your input array. –  Erwin Moller Jul 27 '12 at 14:51
    
Thanks - I missed the docs for the last parameter, and assumed I had to do something odd with count() and then using that as a parameter in array_slice(). –  Alfo Jul 27 '12 at 14:53

Make sure $array is only 50 long:

array_splice($array, 50);

Or return the first 50:

$new_array = array_slice($array, 0, 50);

How easier do you expect it to be? ;)

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With the array by itself, there is no way to limit the number of elements in it.

You can implement your own method of getting the first 50 elements of an array (or even the first 50 after a certain offset) with a loop (I recommend a loop because with associative arrays, array_splice() won't work):

function limit($array, $limit, $offset = 0) {
    $return = array();
    $end = ($limit + $offset);
    $count = 0;
    foreach ($array as $key => $val) {
        if ($count++ > $offset) {
            $return[$key] = $val;
        }
        if ($count == $end) break;
    }
    return $return;
}

EDIT: This function provides the same results as using array_slice($array, $offset, $limit, true);; the fourth-parameter preserves the keys in the associative array.

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array_slice has a $preserve_keys = false 4th parameter for associative arrays. –  complex857 Jul 27 '12 at 14:55
    
@complex857 Good catch; I just looked up the method and confirmed (and have updated my answer to match). Thanks =] –  newfurniturey Jul 27 '12 at 14:59

With SPL (better memory footprint):

// Using fixed array
$fixedArray = SplFixedArray::fromArray($array);
$fixedArray->setSize(min(50, count($array));

// Using iterator
$limitIterator = new LimitIterator(new ArrayIterator($array), 0, 50);
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Added iterator trick. –  Florent Jul 27 '12 at 14:59
1  
+1 I like the LimitIterator, although I wouldn't call it a trick. Maybe a less-popular feature ;) –  nickb Jul 27 '12 at 15:02
    
@nickb it's certainly no trick. I would advise everyone to get to grips with the myriad array functions and the various iterator classes available. –  salathe Jul 30 '12 at 21:41

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