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I've been working with MS Access 2010 for a while now and for the most part everything works. YAY. However, I have large amounts of data to eventually plot (x-axis y-axis pairs) that come from a piece of equipment that I use for work. I can import this data as a seperate table, but I am not particularly fond of the idea of having my database overloaded with seperate tables that are purely to store this data. To my undertanding each table should represent an entity that fits into the large context of the database. Also, for the equipment I'm using right now all the x-axis data is redundant. The question is, what is the best way to divid the data for effecient storage?

Considerations: I keep running into the same problems as I think about this question. Suppose that in either case I made two tables, one to store the x-axis data and another to store the y-axis data, and then had a linking table between the two allowing for a many to many relationship.

On the one hand, I could store one value per Record (all values in one Column). But, then there would need to be a tag field in each of these two tables, thus defeating the purpose of the split.

On the other hand, I could store one value per Field (all value in one Row), which in my case would yield over 2000 fields in each table.

There is a third option, the one I'm currently using, to store one pair per row in a single table. However, there is much redundancy.

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facetiously, "ms access" and "large amounts of data" generally don't go together in any useful sense. –  Marc B Jul 27 '12 at 15:21
    
@MarcB: depends on what the user considers "large amounts of data"; if it's billions of records, I'd agree with you. If we are talking about hundreds of thousands of records (which is beyond what many non-DBA's would consider "large amounts of data") then Access will handle that easily. –  mwolfe02 Jul 27 '12 at 15:45

1 Answer 1

You should stick with your current method. This is by far the simplest method to both retrieve and add to the data. Below I have my reactions to your other suggestions.

Suppose that in either case I made two tables, one to store the x-axis data and another to store the y-axis data, and then had a linking table between the two allowing for a many to many relationship.

This might provide a slight hard drive space improvement if X and Y are not integers. However, it would complicate things significantly for questionable benefit.

On the one hand, I could store one value per Record (all values in one Column). But, then there would need to be a tag field in each of these two tables, thus defeating the purpose of the split.

This would make it a lot more complicated to work with the data and is a bad idea. You would need to use complicated querying to get both data points in the same row. You could do this, but it complicate both input and retrieval.

On the other hand, I could store one value per Field (all value in one Row), which in my case would yield over 2000 fields in each table.

If you do this, you will regret it. This would make it nearly impossible to do any meaningful data analysis later on.

There is a third option, the one I'm currently using, to store one pair per row in a single table. However, there is much redundancy.

This is ideal. You can easily import your data into the two columns, the data is easily retrievable. The redundancies are not important unless the value is irrelevant.

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