Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

This is the line of code in C.
The condition of loop here is ++i.
So how does compiler decide which condition to consider because here other two appear as conditions?

char i=0;
for(i<=5&&i>-1;++i;i>0)
    printf("%d",i);

output

1234..127-128-127....-2-1
share|improve this question
4  
ioccc approaching ? – cnicutar Jul 27 '12 at 15:23
1  
Note that the behavior of the program is implementation-defined (or potentially undefined) and depends on (among other things) the signedness of the char type, the ranges of values representable by char, int, and unsigned int, and the implementation-defined behavior of a narrowing conversion from one signed type to another signed type. In short: writing code like this is perilous. – James McNellis Jul 27 '12 at 16:18
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The for statement works like this:

for (X; Y; Z)
{
    ...
}

translates to

X;
while (Y)
{
    ...
    Z;
}

So your code changes from:

char i=0;
for(i<=5&&i>-1;++i;i>0)
    printf("%d",i);

to:

char i = 0;
i<=5 && i>-1;    // X
while (++i)      // Y
{
    printf("%d", i);
    i > 0;       // Z
}

As you can see, lines marked with X and Z are completely useless. Therefore:

char i = 0;
while (++i)
    printf("%d", i);

This means it will print from 1 up to whenever result of ++i is zero.

If char in your compiler is signed, then the behavior is left to implementation, even though most likely it will overflow to a negative value and work its way up to zero.

If char is positive, this will print positive values up to where it overflows back to 0.

share|improve this answer
    
C11, section 3.4.3.3 (EXAMPLE): An example of undefined behavior is the behavior on integer overflow. – Shahbaz Jul 27 '12 at 16:02
1  
Nit: The behavior is only undefined if char is signed and all values representable by int are also representable by char (i.e., if char and int are represented by the same number of bits). If char is narrower than int, then the behavior is implementation-defined because there is no overflow: the char operand will be promoted to int to perform the increment, then the int-type result will be converted back to char; that conversion does not yield overflow, it has implementation-defined behavior. – James McNellis Jul 27 '12 at 16:21

It doesn't. It runs the first part and i gets set to any side effect of this, then it terminates when the second part is false, in this case when i is 0, then on every loop it runs the 3rd part.

SO the compiler essentially rewrites this as:

char i=0;
i<=5&&i>-1;
do {
     printf("%d",i);
     i>0;
} while ( (++i) != 0)

hint: remember char is signed and twos complement, so i will go 1,2,3....128, -127,-126.... 0

share|improve this answer
    
"remember char is signed" or unsigned: the signedness of char is implementation-defined. – James McNellis Jul 27 '12 at 15:53
    
@JamesMcNellis and needn't be 8bits. But in this case the values the OP gives as output suggests that char is signed on their platform. I was just trying to explain to them how i ever ended up 'false' – Martin Beckett Jul 27 '12 at 15:57

the loop termination condition here is ++i. There is no mystery about it. The loop will stop when i hits 0 (because the it will be 'false')

share|improve this answer
    
Plz see the question which i asked.... – ghostrider Jul 31 '12 at 12:53
    
you answered your own question "So how does compiler decide which condition to consider because here other two appear as conditions". THe middle clause of the for loop is the termination test - ++i in your case. The fact that the other 2 clauses are also conditionals is irrelevant (but confusing to a human reader). The compiler simply produces code that executes the first and third clauses at the approairate time, its doesnt look at the result – pm100 Jul 31 '12 at 15:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.