Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new to MassTransit, and I miss something in my understanding.

Let's say I have a server farm were all nodes can do the same job. The application framework is CQRS's styled. That means I have two base kind of message to publish :

  • Commands : must be handled by exactly one of the server, any of them (the first with job slot free)
  • Events : must be handled by all servers

I've have build an extremely simple MassTransit prototype (a console application that is sending hello every X seconds).

In the API, I can see there is a "publish" method. How can I specify what kind of message it is (one versus all server)?

If I look a the "handler" configuration, I can specify the queue uri. If I specify the same queue for all hosts, all hosts will get the message, but I cannot limit the execution to only one server.

If I listen from a host dedicated queue, only one server will handle the messages, but I don't know how to broadcast the other kind of message.

Please help me to understand what I'm missing.

PS: if it cares, my messaging system is rabbitmq.

In order to test, I have create a common class library with this classes :

public static class ActualProgram
{
    private static readonly CancellationTokenSource g_Shutdown = new CancellationTokenSource();

    private static readonly Random g_Random = new Random();

    public static void ActualMain(int delay, int instanceName)
    {
        Thread.Sleep(delay);
        SetupBus(instanceName);

        Task.Factory.StartNew(PublishRandomMessage, g_Shutdown.Token);

        Console.WriteLine("Press enter at any time to exit");
        Console.ReadLine();
        g_Shutdown.Cancel();

        Bus.Shutdown();
    }

    private static void PublishRandomMessage()
    {
        Bus.Instance.Publish(new Message
        {
            Id = g_Random.Next(),
            Body = "Some message",
            Sender = Assembly.GetEntryAssembly().GetName().Name
        });

        if (!g_Shutdown.IsCancellationRequested)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(g_Random.Next(500, 10000));
            Task.Factory.StartNew(PublishRandomMessage, g_Shutdown.Token);
        }
    }

    private static void SetupBus(int instanceName)
    {
        Bus.Initialize(sbc =>
        {
            sbc.UseRabbitMqRouting();
            sbc.ReceiveFrom("rabbitmq://localhost/simple" + instanceName);
            sbc.Subscribe(subs =>
            {
                subs.Handler<Message>(MessageHandled);
            });
        });
    }

    private static void MessageHandled(Message msg)
    {
        ConsoleColor color = ConsoleColor.Red;
        switch (msg.Sender)
        {
            case "test_app1":
                color = ConsoleColor.Green;
                break;

            case "test_app2":
                color = ConsoleColor.Blue;
                break;

            case "test_app3":
                color = ConsoleColor.Yellow;
                break;
        }
        Console.ForegroundColor = color;
        Console.WriteLine(msg.ToString());
        Console.ResetColor();
    }

    private static void MessageConsumed(Message msg)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(msg.ToString());
    }
}

public class Message
{
    public long Id { get; set; }

    public string Sender { get; set; }

    public string Body { get; set; }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Format("[{0}] {1} : {2}" + Environment.NewLine, Id, Sender, Body);
    }
}

I have also 3 console applications that just run the ActualMain method :

internal class Program
{
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        ActualProgram.ActualMain(0, 1);
    }
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What your wanting is known as Competing Consumers (search SO for that you'll find more info) Using RabbitMQ makes life easy, all you need to do is specify the same queue name for each consumer you start, the message will be processed by only one of them. Instead of generating a unique queue each time as you are doing.

 private static void SetupBus(int instanceName)
{
    Bus.Initialize(sbc =>
    {
        sbc.UseRabbitMqRouting();
        sbc.ReceiveFrom("rabbitmq://localhost/Commands);
        sbc.Subscribe(subs =>
        {
            subs.Handler<Message>(MessageHandled);
        });
    });
}

AFAIK, you'll need to have a separate process for command handlers as opposed to event handlers. All the command handlers will ReceiveFrom the same queue, all event handlers will ReceiveFrom their own unique queue.

The other piece to the puzzle is how you get messages into the bus. You can still use publish for commands, but if you have configured consumers incorrectly you could get multiple executions as the message will go to all consumers, if you want to guarantee the message ends up on a single queue you can use Send rather than Publish.

 Bus.Instance
     .GetEndpoint(new Uri("rabbitmq://localhost/Commands"))
    .Send(new Message
    {
        Id = g_Random.Next(),
        Body = "Some message",
        Sender = Assembly.GetEntryAssembly().GetName().Name
    });
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. This help me a lot to understand the difference. The only think that afraid me is "you'll need to have a separate process for command handlers as opposed to event handlers". This will have impact on the global architecture, but I will live with that if there is not other choice. –  Steve B Aug 22 '12 at 8:02
    
For competing consumers, you'll need separate bus instances for each consumer as well. The reason commands are usually on a seperate bus instance is usually they are processed synchronously where as consumers are processed on multiple threads. MT doesn't let you specify the concurrency on a per message type basis. I think its possible to host multiple buses in a single process but I haven't tried it. I use topshelf (from the same guys) to host each of my "services". It allows you to choose in process (appdomains) or separate process/separate machines at deployment time very easily –  Adam Mills Aug 23 '12 at 11:37
    
thx. I'll take a look –  Steve B Aug 23 '12 at 11:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.