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I'm really stuck with trying to keep div blocks centered with the exception of the last row.

Someone else already created this fiddle that kind of demonstrates my question. You can see how the blocks in the result panel stay centered even when the window is resized. I would like to have similar behavior BUT if the last row contains less blocks than the rows above, then that last row should not get centered but left aligned.

Here is the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/zbbHc/1/

Someone might ask why I don't just use float:left. The problem with that is that I couldn't find a way of centering my blocks using that method without also specifying a fixed width for my wrapper. I'm trying to keep everything as liquid as possible.

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2  
Very interesting, I wonder if this can be done with pure CSS –  Kos Jul 27 '12 at 15:34
    
How wide is your wrapper? Does it matter how many items are on a row? –  JohnC Jul 27 '12 at 15:35
    
Great question! As an expansion to @JohnC 's question, when you say do dont want to apply fixed width to your wrapper do you mean that you would prefer not to set a fixed width for the two "columns"? –  Zachary Kniebel Jul 27 '12 at 15:41
    
As a potential answer, you could split the difference between fixed width and fluid width and specify a min-width –  Zachary Kniebel Jul 27 '12 at 15:42
    
@JohnC My wrapper is 90% wide with 5% margins. I would like to have as many blocks in a row that can fit there. –  Sony packman Jul 27 '12 at 15:52
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/zbbHc/45/

Not sure, but I think this is the maximum we can do using CSS alone.

Update: (THis will not work in all cases, check the code below which work in all cases [I guess])

HTML

<div class="wrapper">
    <div class="iB"></div>
    <div class="iB"></div>
    <div class="iB"></div>
    <div class="iB"></div>
    <div class="iB"></div>
    <div class="iB"></div>
    <div class="iB"></div>
    <div class="iB hide"></div>
    <div class="iB hide"></div>
</div>

CSS

.wrapper {
    width: 100%;
    background: red;
    text-align: center;
    text-align-last: left;
}

.iB {
    display:inline-block;
    width: 200px;
    height: 100px;
    background: green;
}
.iB.hide {
   visibility:hidden; 
}

Here is the quick and dirty method using jQuery. This will add invisible elements automatically

Fiddle here http://jsfiddle.net/fD6fn/

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>Untitled Document</title>
<script type="text/javascript" src="lib/jquery-1.6.2.min.js"></script>
<style>
.wrapper {
    width: 100%;
    background: red;
    text-align: center;
    text-align-last: left;
}

.iB {
    display:inline-block;
    width: 200px;
    height: 100px;
    background: green;
}
.iB.hide {
   visibility:hidden; 
}
​
</style>
</head>

<body>
<div class="wrapper" id="wrapper">
    <div class="iB"></div>
    <div class="iB"></div>
    <div class="iB"></div>
    <div class="iB"></div>
    <div class="iB"></div>
    <div class="iB"></div>
    <div class="iB"></div>
</div>
<script language="javascript">
function findHiddenElementCount() {
var $wrapper = $("#wrapper"),
    itemWidth = "200",
    count = "",
    itemCount = 7; 

    count = $wrapper.width()/itemWidth;

// Some wild logic below, can be optimized.
return parseInt(count) - (itemCount - (parseInt(itemCount/parseInt(count)) * parseInt(count))) ;
}



function addInvisibleElements() 
{
    // Delete invisible items
    $("#wrapper .iB.hide").remove();


    var c = findHiddenElementCount();

    for(var i = 0; i < c;i++)
    {
        $("#wrapper").append('<div class="iB hide"></div>');
    }

}

$(window).bind("resize",addInvisibleElements); // resize handler

$(document).ready(addInvisibleElements); // take care during page load

</script>
</body>
</html>
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Unfortunately, in Chrome that results in everything being aligned left. –  Zach Shipley Jul 27 '12 at 15:57
    
I think you should check that again and play around with your browser size. It seems to work perfectly for me, except that when I get my window to large I need to add more hidden rows. Depending on what the OP is after, a mix of this and Javascript, or just add a large number of hidden rows should work. –  travis Jul 27 '12 at 16:01
    
I find this a pretty interesting suggestion, although there are some negative aspects of this approach, the main concern being that the hidden blocks cause the wrapper to extend vertically longer than it should extend.. Another problem (for me) is that I have no idea how to use javascript to determine the amount of invisible blocks that should be inserted in different situations. –  Sony packman Jul 27 '12 at 16:07
    
Its fairly simple to figure out how many hidden blocks you need. On the window resize event you can check the position of each block to see how many are in the top row. Do a little math and you know the number of hidden blocks to append to the bottom. I'll write up a sample. –  travis Jul 27 '12 at 16:14
    
Here is the example if find the number of blocks to append: jsbin.com/arunic/11/edit –  travis Jul 27 '12 at 16:40
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Why don't you use percentage? http://jsfiddle.net/zbbHc/38/ that's how most of fluid layouts usually work

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That's not centered. In Chrome, at least. –  Roddy of the Frozen Peas Jul 27 '12 at 15:53
    
Because I need to have it centered to the page.. –  Sony packman Jul 27 '12 at 15:54
    
align-center is a really old and now a bad solution, something that people should stop using, there are a lot of ways to center things, check twitter bootstrap, 960.gs fluid and you will find great examples of how fluid layouts work twitter.github.com/bootstrap/examples/fluid.html –  Paradise Jul 27 '12 at 16:00
    
@Paradise makes a good point, though. Normally in a "fluid" layout you'd strive to work solely with relative units. –  Zach Shipley Jul 27 '12 at 16:01
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When you say 'if' the last row has fewer blocks do you mean that it's dynamic content? If you know it will have one then you can just position it relatively to the value of half its own width(and any margins etc)

.iB:last-child{
   position:relative;
   left:-100px;
   background:blue;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/zbbHc/54/

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Hi! I can't know how many blocks are in the last row since I don't know the browser window size of a possible user. If the browser window is very wide, more blocks fit in one row ect. –  Sony packman Jul 27 '12 at 16:19
    
aah i see. hmm, in that case I don't think the DOM would necessarily be registering what we see on the screen in rows, as 'rows', if it's just putting as many items in one line before breaking line it won't recognise rows. I could well be wrong. I'm going to research! interesting question! –  joe coleman Jul 27 '12 at 16:25
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It may be possible to do this with a table (though I tend to try to avoid tables). Table-cells' dimensions are determined by their contents (of course, you can add your own, or max/min dimensions). You could have a table with one column and (although it's not best practice) embed divs into the table (each div being a block).

The width of the table would be fluid because it would be based on the width of the widest cell (thus, the blocks will line up nicely and will look very neat), and you could hard-code or script (of course, I suggest scripting) a style/method to check if the last row contains less blocks, and if it does to set the text-align to left for that cell, only.

This solution could probably use some improvement, but it may be a good start, depending on what your going to use this for.

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