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What can I do with a moved-from object?

For example, see this code:

template<class T> 
void swap(T& a, T& b) 
{ 
    T tmp(std::move(a));
    a = std::move(b); 
    b = std::move(tmp);
} 

Is it just me, or is there a bug here? If you move a into tmp, then doesn't a become invalid?

i.e. Shouldn't the move-assignment to a from b be a move-constructor call with placement new instead?
If not, then what's the difference between the move constructor and move assignment operator?

template<class T>
void swap(T& a, T& b)
{
    T tmp(std::move(a));
    new(&a) T(std::move(b));
    new(&b) T(std::move(tmp));
}
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marked as duplicate by FredOverflow, R. Martinho Fernandes, Blastfurnace, David Rodríguez - dribeas, MSalters Jul 27 '12 at 16:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
related FAQ –  FredOverflow Jul 27 '12 at 16:13
    
@FredOverflow: Thanks for the links, those are helpful. But I don't get it: if move-assignment doesn't require a valid target to begin with, then what's the point of move-construction? Aren't they the same thing then? –  Mehrdad Jul 27 '12 at 16:18
    
@Mehrdad: Suppose you have an object whose construction and copy operations are costly. When you create a temporary object (for example an r-valued one) you are first calling the costly constructor, then the costly copy constructor. But with a move constructor the costly copy is avoided, and in its place a more light copy operation can be done (for example copying the pointer to an allocated array instead of allocating a new array and copying its content). –  Gigi Jul 27 '12 at 16:26
2  
@Mehrdad You are still confused. Just like copy assignment, move assignment does require a valid target object. Moving from an object does not invalidate it. A moved-from object is still an object and needs to be destructed just like any other object. If a moved-from object was somehow invalid, almost any non-trivial destructor would wreak havoc in the system when trying to destruct it. –  FredOverflow Jul 27 '12 at 17:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

When you move data out of an object, the intended semantics is "the value stored here is not supposed to be read, and you're note supposed to do anything to this object except assign it a new value." It's not quite the same as "this object is dead and gone." Specifically, moving data out of an object doesn't end the object's lifetime, and consequently it's perfectly safe to assign that object a new value.

As a result, the initial version of the swap function is safe. After moving data from a, that object holds some unspecified "do not use me" value. This value is then overwritten when move-assigning it the value of b.

That second version is unsafe, because the lifetime of a has not ended before you try to construct a new object on top of it. This leads to undefined behavior.

Hope this helps!

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1  
@Mehrdad: It's value is unspecified. You shouldn't rely on it having a specific value, even if it make sense for the object to have an empty value. –  Gigi Jul 27 '12 at 16:17
2  
@Xeo Not sure what you mean here, but moving from an object definitely does not end its lifetime. The lifetime ends when the destructor starts, and that does not happen when you move from an object. –  FredOverflow Jul 27 '12 at 16:18
1  
@akappa that's undefined behaviour. And Xeo is right for the cases when doing that is not undefined behaviour. Standard reference: §3.8 paragraph 4. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 27 '12 at 16:23
1  
@Mehrdad: or until you get a new brain, heart, etc. from someone else. –  akappa Jul 27 '12 at 16:26
1  
@akappa: He knows that, and it's not undefined behaviour for POD types IIRC. –  Xeo Jul 27 '12 at 16:39

Moving does not make an object invalid. Rather, it remains in a valid but indeterminate state in general. Specific classes have additional guarantees; for example, std::unique_ptr guarantees that it will be null after being moved from.

Remaining a valid object means in particular that it is perfectly fine to assign to the object, which is what the original code does.

Your own proposed solution is heavily broken: When you placement-construct a new object on top of the old one, the lifetime of the old object ends. However, if the destructor of the class has effects, then omitting to call the destructor is undefined behaviour.

Moreover, if you did correctly call the destructor first, but then encountered an exception in the constructor, you'd be in trouble, as you now don't have a valid object which needs to be destroyed at scope exit. Here's a related question of mine on this topic.

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a will still be valid. The data within a will not be reliable any more though. You are not deallocating a when you move its resources, so it's perfectly fine to move new resource to a.

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So what's the difference between the move construction and move assignment? –  Mehrdad Jul 27 '12 at 16:04
2  
@Mehrdad one creates a new object, the other doesn't? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 27 '12 at 16:11
    
Er... if the object is already moved out of the storage space of a, then isn't a dead? What if a doesn't have a notion of an "invalid state"? –  Mehrdad Jul 27 '12 at 16:16
3  
It's not a that is moved, it's the resources within a. If you have a pointer in a to some memory, for example a->data, and you move data to another object, a will still exist. –  Man of One Way Jul 27 '12 at 16:18
1  
@Mehrdad: The move-constructor has undefined behaviour for non-POD types; you're generally not allowed to construct an object on top of an existing object. For example, a might still own some resource despite having been moved, in which case your code would leak that resource. You could cobble something almost valid together by calling the destructor first, but assignment is the way to give an existing object a new value. –  Mike Seymour Jul 27 '12 at 16:35

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