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I'm looking for a creative pattern to enumerate two IEnumerable<>'s synchronized.

If I was making something up and adding to the C# syntax I might write:

foreach(var firstItem, var secondItem in this.ListOne, this.ListTwo)
{
   if (firstItem.Prop == secondItem.Prop)
      WorkSomeMagic(secondItem);

   DoSomethingElse(firstItem);
}

Now, obviously that doesn't exist. What patterns have people used to accomplish something similar when dealing with enumerations that aren't accessible by index? Keep in mind, what is inside my pseudo-foreach would be more complex; I simplified for the example.

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4 Answers 4

You're looking for Zip, which is new in .NET 4 or you can use the implementation here:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/101174/is-there-a-zip-like-method-in-net

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I usually do the following:

using (IEnumerator<int> e1 = this.ListOne.GetEnumerator(), 
                        e2 = this.ListTwo.GetEnumerator()) {
  while (e1.MoveNext() && e2.MoveNext()) { 
    ...
  }
}

Or write an extension method:

public static void EnumerateWith<T>(this IEnumerable<T> left,
  IEnumerable<T> right, Action<T,T> del) {
  using (IEnumerator<T> l =  left.GetEnumerator(), 
                        r = right.GetEnumerator()) { 
    while (l.MoveNext() && r.MoveNext()) {
      del(l.Current,r.Current);
    }
  }
}

ListOne.EnumerateWith(ListTwo, (left, right) => {
  ...
});
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Very nice extension method. Shouldn't there be a => after (left, right) –  Tomas Apr 12 '12 at 12:20
    
@Tomas yes there should, added –  JaredPar Apr 12 '12 at 14:23

As with any general C# question, this will probably have 10 good answers posted before VS2008 even loads. Instead of that rat race, I'll come up with an offbeat "anti-pattern" you should never use. In fact, anyone writing mission critical code, please stop reading now.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

class EnumTwoLists
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var left = new List<int>();
        var right = new List<DateTime>();

        var demo = new LinqAbuse<int, DateTime>(left, right);
        demo.Populate(40, s => s * s, d => new DateTime(2009, d / 31 + 1, d % 31 + 1));
        demo.Enumerate( (s, d) => Console.WriteLine(String.Format("Executing arbitrary code with {0} and {1}", s, d)) );
    }
}

class LinqAbuse<T1, T2>
{
    public LinqAbuse(List<T1> l, List<T2> r)
    {
        left = l;
        right = r;
    }

    List<T1> left;
    List<T2> right;

    public void Populate(int size, Func<int, T1> leftGenerator, Func<int, T2> rightGenerator)
    {
        new int[size].Aggregate(0, (index, empty) => PopulateWrapper(left, right, leftGenerator, rightGenerator, index));
    }

    int PopulateWrapper(List<T1> left, List<T2> right, Func<int, T1> leftGenerator, Func<int, T2> rightGenerator, int index)
    {
        left.Add(leftGenerator(index));
        right.Add(rightGenerator(index));
        return ++index;
    }

    public void Enumerate(Action<T1, T2> loopBody)
    {
        left.Join(right, l => "", r => "",
                  (l, r) => ActionWrapper(l, r, loopBody),
                  new CartesianComparer<object>(right.Count))
            .ToList();
    }        

    object ActionWrapper(T1 x, T2 y, Action<T1, T2> action)
    {
        action(x, y);
        return null;
    }
}

class CartesianComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T>
{        
    public CartesianComparer(int _size)
    {
        size = _size;
        equalsCounter = (size * (size - 1) >> 1) + size; // Combinations(size, 2) + (size - trueCounter)
    }

    private int size;
    private int equalsCounter;
    private int trueCounter = 0;

    public bool Equals(T x, T y)
    {
        if (0 < --equalsCounter)
            return false;

        equalsCounter = size - ++trueCounter;
        return true;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(T obj)
    {            
        return 0;
    }       
}

Aww, isn't she cute? (alternate caption: Mommy, why is Anders crying?)

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You made me chuckle –  Jesse Carter May 10 at 22:02

Ignoring checks for nulls and whatnot:

IEnumerable<T1> first;
IEnumerable<T2> second;
using (IEnumerator<T1> e1 = first.GetEnumerator()) {
    using (IEnumerator<T2> e2 = second.GetEnumerator()) {
        while (e1.MoveNext() && e2.MoveNext()) {
            // do something eith e1.Current and e2.Current
        } 
    }

}

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