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So I've this issue I can't get fixed :-( In my .h I've this:

protected:
   char* _textPath_1;
   FileReader* _reader_3;

in .cpp I've:

_reader_3 = new FileReader();
_textPath_1 = "foo";
_reader_3->openFile(_textPath_1);

And FileReader has this:

private:
   char* fileName;
public:
   signed int openFile(char* name);

but If I write this (just to test):

signed int FileReader::openFile(char* name) {
    std::cout << name << std::endl;
    fileName = name;
    stream.open(fileName, std::ios::in);
    if (!stream.is_open()) {
        FileReader::printErrorOpeningFile(fileName);
        stream.close();
        return -1;
    }
   return 0;
}

fileName is a char * and I need that it gets the same value (foo) of name. I get an error, and I'm not even able to print name, it just print a blank line.. why?

EDIT: it's not working even using strcpy.. Actually inside the function I can't print the value of name, it's like it has been "deininitialized"

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6  
Why do you want to mess around with char * in C++ when you have std::string? –  Mihai Todor Jul 27 '12 at 16:34
1  
By the way, are you really trying to assign a char * to another variable of type char *??? You need to use strcpy for that... –  Mihai Todor Jul 27 '12 at 16:37
    
It's crashing on fileName = name; –  endamaco Jul 27 '12 at 16:44
    
And also I can't read name inside my function –  endamaco Jul 27 '12 at 16:46
    
what is the type of fileName? And what is the value of _reader_3 pointer? –  PermanentGuest Jul 27 '12 at 16:56

3 Answers 3

You need to allocate space for your text string _textPath_1. Try this instead.

char myTextString[] = "foo";
_textPath_1 = myTextString;

This creates a local character array (a character string), which is initialized to "foo\0". It then copies that character string's address to your char pointer _textPath_1. As a LOCAL storage, it will only be valid in the local code block and will not be usable once your code has dropped out of its scope. If you need that string past the local code block, you will need to allocate it from heap memory (using new for instance) and remember to deallocate it after you are done with it.

You cannot use strcpy with your unallocated pointer because strcpy expects the destination char* to be pointing at a character array acting as your destination string buffer. As you haven't allocated any char space at all, it cannot copy "foo" into your _textPath_1, and that's why you get a runtime error when you try to strcpy it.

These and other fun with char* is why std::string was invented. No worries about allocating and deallocating space, having to use strcpy to copy its value, etc etc etc. Consider using std::string _textPath_1 in place of your char* _textPath_1.

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If you're really defining global variables in your header file:

char* _textPath_1;
FileReader* _reader_3;

Then you shouldn't be doing that. Global variables should be declared in header files, but defined in an implementation file.


This code works fine:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

struct FileReader {
    char* fileName;
    std::fstream stream;

    signed int FileReader::openFile(char* name) {
        std::cout << name << std::endl;
        fileName = name;
        stream.open(fileName, std::ios::in);
        if (!stream.is_open()) {
            FileReader::printErrorOpeningFile(fileName);
            stream.close();
            return -1;
        }
        return 0;
    }

    void printErrorOpeningFile(char *) {}
};

int main() {
    char* _textPath_1;
    FileReader* _reader_3;

    _reader_3 = new FileReader();
    _textPath_1 = "foo";
    _reader_3->openFile(_textPath_1);
    delete _reader_3;
}
share|improve this answer
    
They're defined in a protected block in my .h file –  endamaco Jul 27 '12 at 17:06
    
protected how? Do you mean that they're actually not global variables, and are in fact class instance variables with an access specifier of 'protected:'? You ought to call out exactly what they are in your question. –  bames53 Jul 27 '12 at 17:16
    
ok.. just edited my question.. anyway: yes! They are in a protected: block –  endamaco Jul 27 '12 at 17:19
    
The fact that they're protected isn't as relevant as the fact that they're instance variables. You should edit you question to contain an complete, buildable (but small) program that shows the issue. Otherwise people will keep guessing at what the program is and point out errors that relate to their guesses, not necessarily your actual problem. –  bames53 Jul 27 '12 at 17:26

You have to allocate _reader_3 before calling the function.

FileReader* _reader_3 = new FileReader;

I assume fileName is your member variable. Accessing pointers without initialization will result in unpredictable results

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, maybe next time I'll post something it's better If i write everyhing :-D _reader_3 it's already allocated –  endamaco Jul 27 '12 at 17:04
    
can u copy paste the whole file? –  PermanentGuest Jul 27 '12 at 17:26

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