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example: mailto:info@info.com?subjectsomething or mailto:info@info.com

I would like to get only the email address with no subject (if any)

This expression is not enought and I can't make it work:

mailto:(.*)

Thanks

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Is this on a text line by itself or within other text (like on an HTML page)? Also helps to know language you are looking to do the search in. – Mike Brant Jul 27 '12 at 16:52
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this Regular Expression:

mailto:([^\?]*)
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This works, could you please elaborate what does mean? – user1537701 Jul 27 '12 at 16:57
    
This is matching a string that literally starts with "mailto:" but discards that information because it's not inside the parentheses. Then it matches 0 or more characters until it encounters the ? character, and returns the matched characters as a capture group. – Alex W Jul 27 '12 at 17:01

This will look for the matching string within a word boundary. You would need to get the value of the email from the first parenthesized sub-pattern using your language of choice (typically the reference to it would be $1). The second sub-pattern would capture the subject (with ? at the beginning).

\bmailto:(.*)(\?.*)?\b
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You need to save matched characters in a capture group:

mailto:([^?]+)

Now you have your address in $1 (or in other variable; depends on language).

If it is possible that after email address goes something else, you must specify the delimiters. For example, if it is space:

mailto:([^?\S]+)[\s?]

You can also use non-greedy r.e.:

mailto:(.+?)[\s?]

That means "stop as soon as you'll meet \s (space) or ?

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