Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is my first post here and I'm by no means a skilled HTML/CSS/JavaScript programmer so please bear with me if I'm not expressing myself clear enough - sorry if it's too wordy!

I'm using a classic HTML table for tabular content and want to be able to change the background color of a different row than the one I'm currently hovering.

The reason for this is that I have many tables that are divided into "sub-tables", each with its own header and one or more rows below. These sub-tables - all with the same styling - are however not coded as tables, instead I simply use different classes to style them (this mainly because they are so many and so small, with 1-6 rows each incl header).

What I want to do is that once you hover any of the sub-tables both its header and the row you're currenty pointing at should change background color (the latter easily achived with CSS). Thanks to a JavaScript found online I've managed to achive this - see sample code which probably explains this better, see also the code below - however that requires a unique ID for each sub-header. (Note that each sub-table uses a separate tbody - if the onMouseover event was instead applied to each row the color of the sub-header would flicker/go on and off when hovering from one row to another - this never happens with CSS but only with JavaScript - plus creating much more code, of course.)

Instead of having to assign unique IDs to each sub-header I'd like a solution which instead uses the classes, seeing as each sub-table uses the same ones (I'd of course assign a class to tbody then). I suppose the tricky part with this may be to ensure that just the header of the current sub-table is affected and not all at the same time. If it's easier to create a solution where each sub-table is in fact coded as a separate table (which may also be better from a semantic point of view?) then please do so. Even better would of course be if the JavaScript applied the onMouseover etc events by itself, so that I didn't have to put that into the inline code of each sub-table - I've seen that this can be done for buttons etc so I suppose it'd be possible for this to.

I've never used jQuery so a pure JavaScript solution would be much preferred.

For the sample code again please see my fiddle

Many thanks for any input!

The JavaScript:

function changeTo(myId) { document.getElementById(myId).className='sub-header-highlight'; }
function changeBack(myId) { document.getElementById(myId).className='sub-header'; }

The CSS:

thead { color: #FFF; background: #000; }
.sub-header { color: #FFF; font-weight: bold; background: #F00; }
.sub-header-highlight { color:# FFF; font-weight: bold; background: #0F0; }
tr.sub-header:hover { background: #0F0; } /* if JS turned off */

.sub-row1 { color: #000; background: #FFF; }
.sub-row2 { color: #000; background: #EEE; }
tr.sub-row1:hover, .sub-row2:hover { background: #FF0; }

Part of the HTML:

<tbody onMouseover="changeTo('sub1');" onMouseout="changeBack('sub1');">
   <tr class="sub-header" id="sub1">
      <td>Sub-Header 1</td>
   </tr>
   <tr class="sub-row1">
      <td>Contents of row 1</td>
   </tr>
   <tr class="sub-row2">
      <td>Contents of row 2</td>
   </tr>
   <tr class="sub-row1">
      <td>Contents of row 3</td>
   </tr>
</tbody>
share|improve this question
    
You should put your code here too. –  Mageek Jul 27 '12 at 17:29
    
OK, I was trying but couldn't get it to work properly, especially the HTML parts were removed, will try again. –  Mr Love Jul 27 '12 at 17:37
    
If you have a look at the editing help page, it'll show how to format code so it appears. (for in-line code wrap it in backticks `, or for blocks of code separate the code with an empty line, before and after, and indent each line by four spaces). –  David Thomas Jul 27 '12 at 17:39
    
Thanks, code now added. –  Mr Love Jul 27 '12 at 18:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can greatly simplify both your HTML markup and CSS, and there is no need to use Javascript.

  • First, all the classes can come out except for your alternate row styling (unless you care nothing for IE 8 and below, in which case you can take out the IE conditional CSS and the class names. See the browser CSS selector compatibility chart.)
  • Second, change each td inside a sub-header to a th.
  • Third, use the :hover pseudo-selector on the parent tbody to style the th as specified.

See this working in a jsfiddle, tested to work perfectly in IE 7 and Firefox 14.

Here is the CSS:

table { border-collapse:collapse; }
thead { color: #FFF; background-color: #000; }

tbody th { color: #FFF; font-weight: bold; background-color: #F00; text-align:left; }
tbody:hover th { background: #0F0; }

tbody tr:nth-child(odd) { background-color:#EEE; }
tbody tr:hover td { background: #FF0; }

Style Notes:

  • The CSS property "background" expects more than just color, and will reset the other properties as well. Use "background-color" when that's all you want to style.
  • The extra td on the tr:hover is required in order for specificity rules to make IE give it a higher precedence than the special coloring for odd rows.
  • The "odd" rows are really the even ones of the data, because the sub-header consumes the first odd row.
  • Use CSS border-collapse:collapse instead of cellspacing directly on the table.

I had to put the conditional CSS for IE in the HTML section of the fiddle since it must be outside the style tag.

<!--[if lte IE 8]>
<style type="text/css">
  tbody tr.odd { color: #000; background: #EEE; }
</style>
<![endif]-->

And here's the HTML. See how clean it is now?

<table>
   <thead>
      <tr>
         <th>MAIN HEADER</th>
      </tr>
   </thead>
   <tbody>
      <tr>
         <th>Sub-Header 1</th>
      </tr>
      <tr>
         <td>Contents of row 1</td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="odd">
         <td>Contents of row 2</td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
         <td>Contents of row 3</td>
      </tr>
   </tbody>
   <tbody>
      <tr>
         <th>Sub-Header 2</th>
      </tr>
      <tr>
         <td>Contents of row 1</td>
      </tr>
   </tbody>
   <tbody>
      <tr>
         <th>Sub-Header 3</th>
      </tr>
      <tr>
         <td>Contents of row 1</td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="odd">
         <td>Contents of row 2</td>
      </tr>
   </tbody>
</table>

Finally, I realize the colors were probably just examples, so may I suggest that bright primary colors are not going to work well with human cognitive response? You could go for a sort of highlighting effect instead. See a working example that I put together for you, using colors that are (to my eye) more pleasing. See how the section kind of "glows" when you hover over it? Beautiful!

Example of prettier table

Note: In IE8 and before, there will be an extra border on the right side. If you have a multi-column table and you like the inside border thing and want to support IE8 and below, you'll need to add a class to the last cell in each row so it can have its right border removed.

share|improve this answer
    
Many many thanks, I never expected to receive such great answers so soon, seeing as it's Friday night and everything (at least here in Europe) - will read through this more carefully as soon as I've got the time (I'm meant to do something completely else right now) and get back to you. –  Mr Love Jul 27 '12 at 19:08
    
Sorry about the delay - a very big thank you for this solution which provides such a clean code, I've learnt a lot here. Not only do I have a beautiful CSS solution to my problem (now implemented on my site and tested to work perfect in the latest versions of all major browsers + IE8) - I also don't have to use inline classes or JavaScript to stripe my tables anymore (except for IE8 and below, of course)! You've really inspired me to learn more about CSS, as I now realise there's so much more to it than I knew before. (As for the colours I do indeed use others for my site, but thanks anyway.) –  Mr Love Aug 3 '12 at 4:03
    
Glad to hear it! :) –  ErikE Aug 3 '12 at 5:00

You can achieve this with pure CSS (with the usual browser-compatibility provisos), so assuming you're using a relatively modern Chrome, Safari, Firefox, Opera or, possibly, IE 9 (or greater):

tbody:hover tr.sub-header {
    background-color: #0f0;
}

tbody tr.sub-row:hover {
    background-color: #f90;
}​

JS Fiddle demo (obviously, adapt the colours to your taste; these were just for the purposes of a demonstration).

It is, of course, worth mentioning that some browsers might not show the tr element's background-color (since it displays behind the background-color of the td elements), in that case you might need to amend the selectors to target the relevant td elements instead:

tbody:hover tr.sub-header td {
    background-color: #0f0;
}

tbody tr.sub-row:hover td {
    background-color: #f90;
}​
share|improve this answer
1  
you mean pure CSS not Javascript :) –  jackJoe Jul 27 '12 at 17:35
    
I do indeed; I corrected just as your comment popped up... =) –  David Thomas Jul 27 '12 at 17:35
    
Wow that looks fantastic! I was actually thinking that a seemingly simple task like this should be possible to achieve with CSS only, but just couldn't figure out how... Will now test this on my page in different browsers and then get back to you. (As for old IE support I can't really be bothered anymore, also the individual rows will still be highlighted as long as hover is supported.) –  Mr Love Jul 27 '12 at 18:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.