Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The system consists of one central SQL server and two or more satelite servers. The satelite servers collect the measured data and send them to the central server. See the picture: enter image description here

(The picture was taken from the official Service Broker Communication Protocols article and modified.)

I need to make the act of adding another satelite SQL as simple as possible. I mean, setting the newly added satelite SQL should possibly be the same as of the other satelite SQL machines. Is it possible at all?

All SQL servers are located in the same domain, no certificate-based encryption is neccessary -- at least not now. The ease and speed of deployment is the priority now. The security can be improved in the later phase.

In other words, can the satelite SQL use the same message types, the same contract-creation code, the same end-point setting,...

I am a bit confused with routing and target binding. Can you comment on that?

Thanks and have a nice day, Petr

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The absolute simplest of the simplest to deploy is the following config:

  1. Use the same message types and contracts every where. This is a must in any situations, so it kind of goes without saying.
  2. Do no use dialog security. simply GRANT SEND ON SERVICE::[<servicename>] TO [public] everywhere. This eliminates the need for database certificates and remote service bindings.
  3. Do use certificates for endpoints, but do not exchange them (export, import, create login etc). There is a trick: GRANT CONNECT ON ENDPOINT::[<brokerendpointname>] TO [public] allows two endpoints to connect using SSL (certificates) even w/o exchanging certificates.
  4. Use transport routing (meaning enable the special TRANSPORT route and name your services using the [tcp://hostname:port/servicename] convention.

Let me explain why I'm recommending this setup:

  • Removing dialog security simplifies deployment by something like 10x. Dialog security allows a service to authenticate and autorize the sender of each message, but in relatively controlled environments (intranet) you can deploy based on trust: any message received by a service is trusted to come from an authorized sender.
  • Using certificates for endpoints is generally seen as complex because of the need to exchange the certificates to allow connectivity, but the trick of granting connect to public on the broker endpoint removes the requirement to exchange certificates. All machines using this trick can talk to each other w/o any prior setup which is better even than using Windows authentication on the endpoints (that require grant connect to domain\machine$ ro requires deployment of SQL Server instances using specific domain accounts). Again, you loos the ability to say 'No' on a connection, you will accept connection from any SQL instance in your intranet.
  • With TRANSPORT routing any SQL Server instance that joins the 'party' is ready to rock: because the service name contains the host name, all the other machines already know how to talk with this machine and do no require explicit routes to be added.

This configuration is really as close as you get to 'plug-and-play'. New machines can join the communication with any existing SQL Server SSB services immediately without requiring any configuration changes on the other existing machines.

Here is an example of how to configure a machines for such a deployment. Say you want to start by deploying the central server on MACHINE1:

use master;
go

create database master key...
create certificate [MACHINE1] with subject 'MACHINE1';
create endpoint BROKER as tcp (listener_port 4022) for service_broker 
  (authentication certificate [MACHINE1]);
grant connect on endpoint::BROKER to [public];
go

use db1;
create message type...
create contract ...
create queue ...
create service [tcp://MACHINE1:4022/CentralService] 
   on ...
   ([...]);
grant send on service::[tcp://MACHINE1:4022/CentralService] to [public];
create route transport with address = 'TRANSPORT';
go

That's it. Now let ad a node, say on host MACHINE2:

use master;
go

create database master key...
create certificate [MACHINE2] with subject 'MACHINE2';
create endpoint BROKER as tcp (listener_port 4022) for service_broker 
  (authentication certificate [MACHINE2]);
grant connect on endpoint::BROKER to [public];
go

use db2;
create message type...
create contract ...
create queue ...
create service [tcp://MACHINE2:4022/Satellite] 
   on ...
   ([...]);
grant send on service::[tcp://MACHINE2:4022/Satellite] to [public];
create route transport with address = 'TRANSPORT';
go

That's it. Now two things happen:

  • because both endpoints on MACHINE1 and MACHINE2 use certificate based authentication and have granted connect to public, they can connect and exchange messages as is, without the need to exchange (export and import) their endpoint certificates
  • because both databases have created the special TRANSPORT route and the service names have the special [tcp://machine:port/service] syntax the two services can immediately exchange messages as-is, without any explicit routing.

The best thing is how you add a new node, say MACHINE3:

use master;
go

create database master key...
create certificate [MACHINE3] with subject 'MACHINE3';
create endpoint BROKER as tcp (listener_port 4022) for service_broker 
  (authentication certificate [MACHINE3]);
grant connect on endpoint::BROKER to [public];
go

use db2;
create message type...
create contract ...
create queue ...
create service [tcp://MACHINE3:4022/Satellite] 
   on ...
   ([...]);
grant send on service::[tcp://MACHINE3:4022/Satellite] to [public];
create route transport with address = 'TRANSPORT';
go

Now, whiteout any single change to MACHINE1 nor to MACHINE2, the new node MACHINE3 can exchange messages with the central service, and actually with the Satellite of MACHINE2 too, if needed. The endpoints are accepting anybody to connect so MACHINE3 is welcome, and the service names used are auto-routed by the special TRANSPORT routing mechanism. This is the beauty of this configuration, the plug-and-play: adding a new node requires 0 config on the other nodes.

So what gives? The biggest problem is security. Any employee can download SQL Server Express on his desktop, set up an unauthorized Satellite node and start exchanging messages with the Central service. There really isn't anything to stop him, you have explicitly open all gates. A more subtle problem is when a service moves. When the service [tcp://MACHINE3:4022/Satellite] is moved (eg. via database backup/restore) to MACHINE4 the name of the service is still a valid TRANSPORT route syntax name, but is incorrect. Depending on how important is to preserve existing conversation, you can choose to nuke the service and create a new one, named [tcp://MACHINE4:4022/Satellite] and party (you cannot rename a service, you must drop and create a new one). If maintaining existing conversation is critical then there are workarounds, as adding an explicit route for it on the Central service database will take precedence over the last-resort TRANSPORT route and messages will be redirected correctly. The important thing is that there are solutions :)

share|improve this answer
    
A small related question: Could the message types for request and reply use the same identifier? (Is it a good idea to start new question on how to choose the identification strings?) Thanks. –  pepr Aug 3 '12 at 10:20
    
It entirely dependent on business rules –  Remus Rusanu Aug 3 '12 at 11:06
    
Must the master key and the certificate created on the master database? Is the master the fixed point in the universe for the service broker? (The reason is I would like to avoid situation when someone else needs the master key -- i.e. this would require sharing the password.) –  pepr Aug 7 '12 at 13:13
3  
Endpoints are instance wide objects and as such they can only be configured through [master]. The certificate used must be in master. The private key associated with the certificate must also be in master and it must be encrypted with the database master key in order for the endpoint to be able to access it w/o user intervention (w/o user opening the certificate) because of the background nature of endpoint activities. Therefore the answer is Yes, it must be in master. –  Remus Rusanu Aug 7 '12 at 13:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.