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I'm trying to apply an error class of a red border color to my text input field like so:

jquery

//save
...
$("input.required").each(function(){
    if ($.trim($(this).val()).length == 0){                               
        $(this).addClass("form_error");
        formValid = false;
    }
    else{
        $(this).removeClass("form_error");
    }
});

HTML

<div class="control-group">
  <label class="control-label" for="city_id">City</label>
  <div class="controls">
    <input class="span2 required" type="text" value="" name="test" id='testId'/>
  </div>
</div>

CSS

textarea,
input[type="text"]{
  border: 1px solid #cccccc;
}

.form_error {
  border-color: #ee5f5b;
  border: 1px solid #ee5f5b;
}

This is working for my select elements but not text inputs. Any idea what I'm missing?

share|improve this question
    
do you have any border or border-color css rules defined after the .form-error rule? Check how the css rules are applied in firebug to see it the red border rule is not overriden. If possible maybe post an url to the page –  Bogdan Jul 27 '12 at 17:44
    
Try changing the class from "span2 required" to just "required". –  Alex W Jul 27 '12 at 17:46
    
Looks perfectly fine to me, is it sure you don't have errors somewhere else? I have a pretty much similar code that works. Also, copied yours, it also works: jsfiddle.net/8kM5c –  Aadaam Jul 27 '12 at 17:46
    
@AlexW: nah, multiclasses are one of the few good things about CSS actually, and this code does work. –  Aadaam Jul 27 '12 at 17:47
    
I'm using Twitter Bootstrap and it looks like they define the border color prior to my style, but should my addClass call over-right that? –  Paul Jul 27 '12 at 17:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is working for me if I remove the

textarea,
input[type="text"]{
  border: 1px solid #cccccc;
}

part. I'm guessing that your class is getting applied, but the element styling is getting applied last and ends up winning.

If removing the section above isn't an option, you can also try changing .form_error to be

.form_error {
  border-color: #ee5f5b;
  border: 1px solid #ee5f5b !important;
}

which will make sure that .form_error's styling wins over the element styling. It's a little kludgy, but it will work (at least in Chrome, which is where I'm testing this).

share|improve this answer
1  
This is not a matter of rule order, but of Specificity.form_error has a Specificity of 0-0-1-0, whereas input[type="text"] has one of 0-0-1-1. –  CBroe Jun 1 at 19:10
    
+1 to CBroe - somehow I'd never heard the term 'specificity' applied to CSS. So I've learned something new today, and suddenly a lot of things make more sense. Thanks! This seems like a pretty good explanation of the topic: smashingmagazine.com/2007/07/27/… –  E.Z. Hart Jun 1 at 23:34

you might need to specify a border style too:

border: 1px solid #ee5f5b;
share|improve this answer
    
I actually tried that but still no luck... –  Paul Jul 27 '12 at 17:44

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