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For an Rx based change tracking solution I am in need of an operator which can get me the first and most recent item in an observable sequence.

How would I write an Rx operator that produces the following marble diagram (Note: the brackets are used just to lineup the items...I'm not sure how best to represent this in text):

     xs:---[a  ]---[b  ]-----[c  ]-----[d  ]---------|
desired:---[a,a]---[a,b]-----[a,c]-----[a,d]---------| 
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using the same naming as @Wilka you can use the below extension which is somewhat self-explanatory:

public static IObservable<TResult> FirstAndLatest<T, TResult>(this IObservable<T> source, Func<T,T,TResult> func)
{
    var published = source.Publish().RefCount();
    var first = published.Take(1);        
    return first.CombineLatest(published, func);
}

Note that it doesn't necessarily return a Tuple, but rather gives you the option of passing a selector function on the result. This keeps it in line with the underlying primary operation (CombineLatest). This is obviously easily changed.

Usage (if you want Tuples in the resulting stream):

Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(0.1))
          .FirstAndLatest((a,b) => Tuple.Create(a,b))
          .Subscribe(Console.WriteLine);
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3  
You should add a Publish operator to share the side-effects of subscribing to source. The FirstAndLatest implementation above will cause two subscriptions to source for each subscription to its result, which may cause a lot of duplicate computation (or worse, side-effects such as initiating I/O and whatnot). –  Bart De Smet Jul 28 '12 at 22:13
    
I'm accepting this as the answer since it was the first correct answer posted though Bart's comment makes me wonder how to incorporate Publish() into the implementation. It's not just a matter of tacking Publish() on the end. –  Damian Jul 29 '12 at 0:01
    
As per @BartDeSmet I've added Publish (also added RefCount, not sure if that's the preferred way, or calling Connect). –  yamen Jul 29 '12 at 21:20
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I suspect there's a much better way of doing this (and I dislike using Do), but you could create an operator like this

public static IObservable<Tuple<T, T>> FirstAndLatest2<T>(this IObservable<T> source)
{
    return Observable.Defer(() => {
        bool hasFirst = false;
        T first = default(T);

        return source
            .Do(item =>
            {
                if (!hasFirst)
                {
                    hasFirst = true;
                    first = item;
                }
            })
            .Select(current => Tuple.Create(first, current));
    });
}

Then you would use it like this:

Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(0.1))
    .FirstAndLatest()
    .Subscribe(Console.WriteLine);
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2  
FirstAndLatest is incorrect. The hasFirst and first state is shared amongst all subscriptions, due to the lack of laziness. All custom operators should start by a call to Observable.Create, unless it's purely a "macro" for a composition of existing operators. Alternatively, you could use Observable.Defer here as well in order to create per-subscription state. –  Bart De Smet Jul 28 '12 at 22:12
    
Thanks, I'd missed that. I've updated my answer to use Observable.Defer –  Wilka Jul 30 '12 at 8:51
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Try this:

public static IObservable<Tuple<T, T>> FirstAndLatest<T>(
    this IObservable<T> source)
{
    return
        source
            .Take(1)
            .Repeat()
            .Zip(source, (x0, xn) => Tuple.Create(x0, xn));
}

Simple, huh?


Or, as an alternative to share the underlying source, try this:

public static IObservable<Tuple<T, T>> FirstAndLatest<T>(
    this IObservable<T> source)
{
    return
        source.Publish(
            s =>
                s.Take(1)
                .Repeat()
                .Zip(s, (x0, xn) => Tuple.Create(x0, xn)));
}

WHOOPS! Scratch this. It doesn't work. It essentially keeps producing a pair of the latest values. Publishing like this isn't working. The original implementation is the best.

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1  
You should add a Publish operator to share the side-effects of subscribing to source. The FirstAndLatest implementation above will cause two subscriptions to source for each subscription to its result, which may cause a lot of duplicate computation (or worse, side-effects such as initiating I/O and whatnot). –  Bart De Smet Jul 28 '12 at 22:14
    
@BartDeSmet - I implemented it this way on purpose. If the source observable is hot then do we not want the computation to occur for each subscription? Nevertheless I'll make an alternative implementation to avoid these issues. –  Enigmativity Jul 29 '12 at 0:48
    
@Enigmativity still think Take(1).CombineLatest is more appropriate than Take(1).Repeat().Zip. –  yamen Jul 30 '12 at 20:39
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