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I have a method which takes an array as a parameter from another class:

public void memPass(Memory[] memLocList) {

    memList = memLocList;

            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        System.out.println(memList[i].getSomething());
    }
}

-EDIT- The above prints out 10 values (integers) but if I try the same in the other method with an integer between 0 & 10 I get an NPE.

Can anyone tell me how to access the elements of this array from another method, which also takes in a parameter from another class?

I'm trying to do something along these lines:

public void accessArray(int mem) {

           int someInt = memList[mem].getSomething();
}

-EDIT- Sorry, I should add that this gives a NullPointerException.

-NEW EDIT-

OK, I've now edited the code so that all I have in the class is:

public class PLoop {

// instance variable
public Memory[] memlist;

  // method 1 
  public void memPass(Memory[] memLocList) {

   memList = memLocList;
   System.out.println(memList.length);
  }

  // method 2
  public void accessArray(int mem) {

   System.out.println(memList.length);
  }
}

The first method prints an integer representing the length of "memList" and the second gives an NPE.

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1  
What you've got looks reasonable enough. How about an SSCCE? Is memPass() actually called? What value of memLocList is passed? Have you tried using a debugger to determine what is null? –  Matt Ball Jul 27 '12 at 19:10
    
Are memPass() and accessArray() methods of the same class? Is memList a member variable of that class? If yes to both, the code you've already written here works as-is. –  DGH Jul 27 '12 at 19:10
1  
Looking at your question tags nullpointerexception it means that at mem index of memList there is null value which you're trying to use by getSomething(). Or memList is null (this is not the same as memList in previous method) –  Xeon Jul 27 '12 at 19:11
    
@nkr that will AIOOBE, not NPE. –  Matt Ball Jul 27 '12 at 19:12
    
Hi DGH, both methods are in the same class. memList is an instance variable of that class. Looks like something else is going wrong I guess. –  Robert Jul 27 '12 at 19:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If I'm understanding you right, you want to be able to store memLocList then access it later? If so, I can't see what creating an instance variable wouldn't work.

public class Test {
    public Memory[] memlist;

    public void memPass(Memory[] memLocList) {
        memList = memLocList;
    }

    public void accessArray(int mem) {
        int someInt = memList[mem].getSomething();
    }
}

Of course, I don't work in Java enough any more, so it might not be possible to create and assign an instance variable like that. But you could always store the elements in another container.

public class Test {
    public List<Memory> memlist;

    public void memPass(Memory[] memLocList) {
        memlist = new ArrayList<Memory>(Arrays.asList(memLocList));
    }

    public void accessArray(int mem) {
        int someInt = memList.get(mem).getSomething();
    }
}

Sorry if I have any syntax errors. But you get the main idea.

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I actually only managed to get this working by moving both of these methods into the same class as the array, rather than passing the array as a parameter. –  Robert Aug 5 '12 at 12:01

In your implementation, you are already assuming that the array being passed to the method has 10 elements and that each of these array items has a value, hence, at some point you encounter a NullPointerException. This is dangerous especially when you are just processing an array that is passed as an argument to the method. To ensure that you are only accessing the elements that are available in the array, you need to check what the length of the array is. Also, you need to ensure that whenever you call the methods of an element in an array, (or do anything with it), check first whether it is actually there. For your for loop, you can do something like this:

if (memList != null) {
    for (int i = 0; i < memList.length; i++) {
       if (memList[i] != null) {
         System.out.println(memList[i].getSomething());
       }
    }
}

That way it is safe from nullpointer exceptions. Using the same concept, you can also apply it to your method like this:

public void accessArray(int mem) {

   if (mem > -1 && memList != null && memList.length > mem && memList[mem] != null){
      int someInt = memList[mem].getSomething();
   }
}

Of course this is assuming that the method with the for loop and the accessArray method are in the same class (or parent-child class) and memList is an instance variable.

And to save the elements of the array as a deep copy of memLocList, you can use what @GJK has suggested which is Arrays.asList to an instance variable and apply the same concept of nullpointer checking that I mentioned above.

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If memList is an instance variable of that class and this is the same class in both situations (both methods) then this is obviously a null value at some index of memList.

private static class Memory {
    private static int index = 0;

    public int getSomething() {
        return index++;
    }
}

private static class Test {
    public Memory[] memlist;

    public void memPass(Memory[] memLocList) {
        memlist = memLocList;
    }

    public void accessArray(int mem) {
        int someInt = memlist[mem].getSomething();
        System.out.println(someInt);
    }
}
public static void main(String args[]) {
    Test t = new Test();
    Memory[] memList = new Memory[4];
    memList[0] = new Memory();
    memList[1] = null;
    t.memPass(memList);
    t.accessArray(0);
    t.accessArray(0);
    t.accessArray(1); //NPE thrown because null value in array
    //or
    Test t2 = new Test();
    t2.accessArray(0); //NPE thrown because array is null (different instance)
}
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