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How would you divide a number by 3 without using *, /, +, -, %, operators?

The number may be signed or unsigned.

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13  
@AlexandreC. - those techniques are using addition (+) though. –  hatchet Jul 27 '12 at 19:40
15  
This was oracle so what parts of oracle were you allowed to use? –  Hogan Jul 27 '12 at 19:45
7  
The identified duplicate isn't a duplicate. Note that several answers here use neither bit shifting or addition since this question didn't restrict a solution to those operations. –  Michael Burr Jul 28 '12 at 0:37
56  
...and here is how PL/SQL is born. –  ssg Jul 29 '12 at 13:28
4  
BTW: The other question was about checking if a number is divisible by 3. This question is about dividing by 3. –  wildplasser Jul 30 '12 at 13:57
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47 Answers 47

Quite amused none answered with a generic division:

/* For the given integer find the position of MSB */
int find_msb_loc(unsigned int n)
{
    if (n == 0)
        return 0;

    int loc = sizeof(n)  * 8 - 1;
    while (!(n & (1 << loc)))
        loc--;
    return loc;
}


/* Assume both a and b to be positive, return a/b */
int divide_bitwise(const unsigned int a, const unsigned int b)
{
    int int_size = sizeof(unsigned int) * 8;
    int b_msb_loc = find_msb_loc(b);

    int d = 0; // dividend
    int r = 0; // reminder
    int t_a = a;
    int t_a_msb_loc = find_msb_loc(t_a);
    int t_b = b << (t_a_msb_loc - b_msb_loc);

    int i;
    for(i = t_a_msb_loc; i >= b_msb_loc; i--)  {
        if (t_a > t_b) {
            d = (d << 1) | 0x1;
            t_a -= t_b; // Not a bitwise operatiion
            t_b = t_b >> 1;
         }
        else if (t_a == t_b) {
            d = (d << 1) | 0x1;
            t_a = 0;
        }
        else { // t_a < t_b
            d = d << 1;
            t_b = t_b >> 1;
        }
    }

    r = t_a;
    printf("==> %d %d\n", d, r);
    return d;
}

The bitwise addition has already been given in one of the answers so skipping it.

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#!/bin/ruby

def div_by_3(i)
  i.div 3        # always return int http://www.ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Numeric.html#method-i-div
end
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1  
I'm pretty sure you can wrap Ruby call as an external call from C with popen() –  A.B Jul 30 '12 at 15:05
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All answers are probably not that what the interviewer liked to hear:

My answer:

"I would never do that, who will me pay for such silly things. Nobody will have an advantage on that, its not faster, its only silly. Prozessor designers have to know that, but this must then work for all numbers, not only for division by 3"

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It seems no one mentioned the division criterion for 3 represented in binary - sum of even digits should equal the sum of odd digits (similar to criterion of 11 in decimal). There are solutions using this trick under Check if a number is divisible by 3.

I suppose that this is the possible duplicate that Michael Burr's edit mentioned.

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Where InputValue is the number to divide by 3

SELECT AVG(NUM) 
  FROM (SELECT InputValue NUM from sys.dual
         UNION ALL SELECT 0 from sys.dual
         UNION ALL SELECT 0 from sys.dual) divby3
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#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct { char a,b,c; } Triple;

unsigned long div3(Triple *v, char *r) {
  if ((long)v <= 2)  
    return (unsigned long)r;
  return div3(&v[-1], &r[1]);
}

int main() {
  unsigned long v = 21; 
  int r = div3((Triple*)v, 0); 
  printf("%ld / 3 = %d\n", v, r); 
  return 0;
}
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Why don't we just apply the definition studied at College? The result maybe inefficient but clear, as the multiplication is just a recursive subtraction and subtraction is an addition, then the addition can be performed by a recursive xor/and logic port combination.

#include <stdio.h>

int add(int a, int b){
   int rc;
   int carry;
   rc = a ^ b; 
   carry = (a & b) << 1;
   if (rc & carry) 
      return add(rc, carry);
   else
      return rc ^ carry; 
}

int sub(int a, int b){
   return add(a, add(~b, 1)); 
}

int div( int D, int Q )
{
/* lets do only positive and then
 * add the sign at the end
 * inversion needs to be performed only for +Q/-D or -Q/+D
 */
   int result=0;
   int sign=0;
   if( D < 0 ) {
      D=sub(0,D);
      if( Q<0 )
         Q=sub(0,Q);
      else
         sign=1;
   } else {
      if( Q<0 ) {
         Q=sub(0,Q);
         sign=1;
      } 
   }
   while(D>=Q) {
      D = sub( D, Q );
      result++;
   }
/*
* Apply sign
*/
   if( sign )
      result = sub(0,result);
   return result;
}

int main( int argc, char ** argv ) 
{
    printf( "2 plus 3=%d\n", add(2,3) );
    printf( "22 div 3=%d\n", div(22,3) );
    printf( "-22 div 3=%d\n", div(-22,3) );
    printf( "-22 div -3=%d\n", div(-22,-3) );
    printf( "22 div 03=%d\n", div(22,-3) );
    return 0;
}

As someone says... first make this work. Note that algorithm should work for negative Q...

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Here it is in Python with, basically, string comparisons and a state machine.

def divide_by_3(input):
  to_do = {}
  enque_index = 0
  zero_to_9 = (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)
  leave_over = 0
  for left_over in (0, 1, 2):
    for digit in zero_to_9:
      # left_over, digit => enque, leave_over
      to_do[(left_over, digit)] = (zero_to_9[enque_index], leave_over)
      if leave_over == 0:
        leave_over = 1
      elif leave_over == 1:
        leave_over = 2
      elif leave_over == 2 and enque_index != 9:
        leave_over = 0
        enque_index = (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)[enque_index]
  answer_q = []
  left_over = 0
  digits = list(str(input))
  if digits[0] == "-":
    answer_q.append("-")
  digits = digits[1:]
  for digit in digits:
    enque, left_over = to_do[(left_over, int(digit))]
    if enque or len(answer_q):
      answer_q.append(enque)
  answer = 0
  if len(answer_q):
    answer = int("".join([str(a) for a in answer_q]))
  return answer
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Good 'ol bc:

$ num=1337; printf "scale=5;${num}\x2F3;\n" | bc
445.66666
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if we consider __div__ is not orthographically /

def divBy3(n):
    return n.__div__(3)

print divBy3(9), 'or', 9//3
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3 in base 2 is 11.

So just do long division (like in middle school) in base 2 by 11. It is even easier in base 2 than base 10.

For each bit position starting with most significant:

Decide if prefix is less than 11.

If it is output 0.

If it is not output 1, and then substitute prefix bits for appropriate change. There are only three cases:

 11xxx ->    xxx    (ie 3 - 3 = 0)
100xxx ->   1xxx    (ie 4 - 3 = 1)
101xxx ->  10xxx    (ie 5 - 3 = 2)

All other prefixes are unreachable.

Repeat until lowest bit position and you're done.

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Here's a method my Grandfather taught me when I was a child. It requires + and / operators but it makes calculations easy.

Add the individual digits together and then see if its a multiple of 3.

But this method works for numbers above 12.

Example: 36,

3+6=9 which is a multiple of 3.

42,

4+2=6 which is a multiple of 3.

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Well you could think of using a graph/tree like structure to solve the problem. Basically generate as many vertices as the number that is to be divided by 3. Then keep pairing each un-paired vertex with two other vertices.

Rough pseudocode:

function divide(int num)
    while(num!=0)
        Add a new vertice to vertiexList.
        num--
    quotient = 0
    for each in vertexList(lets call this vertex A)
        if vertexList not empty
            Add an edge between A and another vertex(say B)
        else
            your Remainder is 1 and Quotient is quotient
        if vertexList not empty
            Add an edge between A and another vertex(say C)
        else
            your remainder is 2 and Quotient is quotient
        quotient++
        remove A, B, C from vertexList
    Remainder is 0 and Quotient is quotient

This can obviously be optimized and the complexity depends on how big you number is, but it shoud work providing you can do ++ and --. It's as good as counting only cooler.

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Using a Linux shell script:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int number = 30;
    char command[25];
    snprintf(command, 25, "echo $((%d %c 3)) ", number, 47);
    system( command );
    return 0;
}

See my another answer.

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Generally, a solution to this would be:

log(pow(exp(numerator),pow(denominator,-1)))

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I would use this code to divide all positive, non float numbers. Basically you want to align the divisor bits to the left to match the dividend bits. For each segment of the dividend (size of divisor) you want to check to make sure if the the segment of dividend is greater than the divisor then you want to Shift Left and then OR in the first registrar. This concept was originally created in 2004 (standford I believe), Here is a C version which uses that concept. Note: (I modified it a bit)

int divide(int a, int b)
{
    int c = 0, r = 32, i = 32, p = a + 1;
    unsigned long int d = 0x80000000;

    while ((b & d) == 0)
    {
        d >>= 1;
        r--;
    }

    while (p > a)
    {
        c <<= 1;
        p = (b >> i--) & ((1 << r) - 1);
        if (p >= a)
            c |= 1;
    }
    return c; //p is remainder (for modulus)
}

Example Usage:

int n = divide( 3, 6); //outputs 2
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Easy!

x /= 3;

does not use the / operator. (/= is a different operator)

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protected by Praveen Mar 14 at 13:27

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