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Given below is a snippet from a class of which I am trying to create objects and getting error:

class FoF(object):
        def __init__(self,path):
                filepath=[]
                filepath.append(self.FileOrFolder(path))

Upon executing which I get the following error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "PathOps.py", line 6, in __init__
    def __init__(self,path):
  NameError: global name 'filepath' is not defined

After which I tried:

filepath=[]
class FoF(object):
        def __init__(self,path):
                global filepath.append(self.FileOrFolder(path))

And again:

File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "PathOps.py", line 6, in __init__
    global filepath.append(self.FileOrFolder(path))
NameError: global name 'filepath' is not defined

What is causing the error and how do I fix it?

share|improve this question
1  
That code would not produce that error, so we'd need to see more context. The only thing that could be said from what you've posted is that 1. the global statement is not necessary and 2. you probably meant self.filepath – Julian Jul 27 '12 at 20:15
    
yes self.filepath fixes it.however, this means that every time i create an object the filepath for that object becomes empty. I need a filepath persistent across objects using it. – ritratt Jul 27 '12 at 20:19
1  
Then you want a class attribute – Julian Jul 27 '12 at 20:24
    
Ahhhh Ooooohh....thanks ^_^ – ritratt Jul 27 '12 at 20:36
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try using insted of global the special word self.

So something like this

class FoF(object):
    def __init__(self,path):
        self.filepath=[]
        self.filepath.append(self.FileOrFolder(path))

The reason this error comes up is because what python thinks you're trying to do is one of two things:

  1. Either you're trying to reference a global variable called filepath -- which is clear that's not what you're trying
  2. What's not so clear is that you could also define a class attribute called filepath -- the only problem with that is that you can't define a class attribute with a function of that class. You can only do so within the class -- outside a class function

So in order to declare variables within a function you have to use the word self before it.

Edit** if you want it to be an attribute of the class -- as I'm assuming is what you meant you could do so like this:

class FoF(object):
    filepath=[]
    def __init__(self,path):
        self.filepath.append(self.FileOrFolder(path))
share|improve this answer
    
yes self.filepath fixes it.but i want it to be a global variable. how to do that? – ritratt Jul 27 '12 at 20:20
    
Remove the add a self. on the filepath in __init__ in your second example. – mgilson Jul 27 '12 at 20:22
    
@mgilson yes you are right. Please see my edits. – Florin Stingaciu Jul 27 '12 at 20:26
2  
Also note that you're not quite right. You can certainly declare class attributes within methods. You just need to reference the class explicity FoF.attribute="foo" or via the instance self.__class__.attribute="foo". Finally, there are classmethods which pass in the class instead of the instance as the first argument. – mgilson Jul 27 '12 at 20:32

I don't think you're giving us enough information. For example:

>>> class FoF(object):
...     def __init__(self, path):
...             junk = []
...             junk.append(path)
... 
>>> foo = FoF('bar/path')

produces no error.

What, exactly, are you trying to do?

share|improve this answer
    
I did the exact thing except I imported FoF and then created an object. – ritratt Jul 28 '12 at 8:12

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