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I am trying to make an LCG Random Number Generator run in parallel using CUDA & GPU's. However, I am having trouble actually getting multiple threads running at the same time.Here is a copy of the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>

__global__ void rng(long *cont)
{

    int a=9, c=3, F, X=1; 
    long M=524288, Y;     
    printf("\nKernel X is %d\n", X[0]);     
    F=X;
    Y=X;
    printf("Kernel F is %d\nKernel Y is %d\n", F, Y);
    Y=(a*Y+c)%M;
    printf("%ld\t", Y);
    while(Y!=F)
    {
        Y=(a*Y+c)%M;
        printf("%ld\t", Y);
    cont[0]++;
    }
}
int main()
{
    long cont[1]={1};
    int X[1];
    long *dev_cont;
    int *dev_X;
    cudaEvent_t beginEvent;
    cudaEvent_t endEvent;
    cudaEventCreate( &beginEvent );
    cudaEventCreate( &endEvent );
    printf("Please give the value of the seed X ");
    scanf("%d", &X[0]);
    printf("Host X is: %d", *X);
    cudaEventRecord( beginEvent, 0);
    cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_cont, sizeof(long) );
    cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_X, sizeof(int) );
    cudaMemcpy(dev_cont, cont, 1 * sizeof(long), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
    cudaMemcpy(dev_X, X, 1 * sizeof(int), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
    rng<<<1,1>>>(dev_cont);
    cudaMemcpy(cont, dev_cont, 1 * sizeof(long), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
    cudaEventRecord( endEvent, 0);
    cudaEventSynchronize (endEvent );
    float timevalue;
    cudaEventElapsedTime (&timevalue, beginEvent, endEvent);
    printf("\n\nYou generated a total of %ld numbers", cont[0]);
    printf("\nCUDA Kernel Time: %.2f ms\n", timevalue);
    cudaFree(dev_cont);
    cudaFree(dev_X);
    cudaEventDestroy( endEvent );
    cudaEventDestroy( beginEvent );
    return 0;
}

Right now I am only sending one block with one thread. However, if I send 100 threads, the only thing that will happen is that it will produce the same number 100 times and then proceed to the next number. In theory this is what is meant to be expected but it automatically disregards the purpose of "random numbers" when a number is repeated.

The idea I want to implement is to have multiple threads. One thread will use that formula: Y=(a*Y+c)%M but using an initial value of Y=1, then another thread will use the same formula but with an initial value of Y=1000, etc etc. However, once the first thread produces 1000 numbers, it needs to stop making more calculations because if it continues it will interfere with the second thread producing numbers with a value of Y=1000.

If anyone can point in the right direction, at least in the way of creating multiple threads with different functions or instructions inside of them, to run in parallel, I will try to figure out the rest.

Thanks!

UPDATE: July 31, 8:14PM EST

I updated my code to the following. Basically I am trying to produce 256 random numbers. I created the array where those 256 numbers will be stored. I also created an array with 10 different seed values for the values of Y in the threads. I also changed the code to request 10 threads in the device. I am also saving the numbers that are generated in an array. The code is not working correctly as it should. Please advise on how to fix it or how to make it achieve what I want.

Thanks!

#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>

__global__ void rng(long *cont, int *L, int *N)
{

    int Y=threadIdx.x;
    Y=N[threadIdx.x];
    int a=9, c=3, i;
    long M=256;
    for(i=0;i<256;i++)
    {
        Y=(a*Y+c)%M;
        N[i]=Y;
        cont[0]++;
    }
}
int main()
{
    long cont[1]={1};
    int i;
    int L[10]={1,25,50,75,100,125,150,175,200,225}, N[256];
    long *dev_cont;
    int *dev_L, *dev_N;
    cudaEvent_t beginEvent;
    cudaEvent_t endEvent;
    cudaEventCreate( &beginEvent );
    cudaEventCreate( &endEvent );
    cudaEventRecord( beginEvent, 0);
    cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_cont, sizeof(long) );
    cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_L, sizeof(int) );
    cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_N, sizeof(int) );
    cudaMemcpy(dev_cont, cont, 1 * sizeof(long), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
    cudaMemcpy(dev_L, L, 10 * sizeof(int), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
    cudaMemcpy(dev_N, N, 256 * sizeof(int), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
    rng<<<1,10>>>(dev_cont, dev_L, dev_N);
    cudaMemcpy(cont, dev_cont, 1 * sizeof(long), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
    cudaMemcpy(N, dev_N, 256 * sizeof(int), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
    cudaEventRecord( endEvent, 0);
    cudaEventSynchronize (endEvent );
    float timevalue;
    cudaEventElapsedTime (&timevalue, beginEvent, endEvent);
    printf("\n\nYou generated a total of %ld numbers", cont[0]);
    printf("\nCUDA Kernel Time: %.2f ms\n", timevalue);
    printf("Your numbers are:");
    for(i=0;i<256;i++)
    {
        printf("%d\t", N[i]);
    }
    cudaFree(dev_cont);
    cudaFree(dev_L);
    cudaFree(dev_N);
    cudaEventDestroy( endEvent );
    cudaEventDestroy( beginEvent );
    return 0;
}

@Bardia - Please let me know how I can change my code to accommodate my needs.

UPDATE: August 1, 5:39PM EST

I edited my code to accommodate @Bardia's modifications to the Kernel code. However a few errors in the generation of numbers are coming out. First, the counter that I created in the kernel to count the amount of numbers that are being created, is not working. At the end it only displays that "1" number was generated. The Timer that I created to measure the time it takes for the kernel to execute the instructions is also not working because it keeps displaying 0.00 ms. And based on the parameters that I have set for the formula, the numbers that are being generated and copied into the array and then printed on the screen do not reflect the numbers that are meant to appear (or even close). These all used to work before.

Here is the new code:

#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>

__global__ void rng(long *cont, int *L, int *N)
{

    int Y=threadIdx.x;
    Y=L[threadIdx.x];
    int a=9, c=3, i;
    long M=256;
    int length=ceil((float)M/10); //256 divided by the number of threads.
    for(i=(threadIdx.x*length);i<length;i++)
    {
        Y=(a*Y+c)%M;
        N[i]=Y;
        cont[0]++;
    }
}
int main()
{
    long cont[1]={1};
    int i;
    int L[10]={1,25,50,75,100,125,150,175,200,225}, N[256];
    long *dev_cont;
    int *dev_L, *dev_N;
    cudaEvent_t beginEvent;
    cudaEvent_t endEvent;
    cudaEventCreate( &beginEvent );
    cudaEventCreate( &endEvent );
    cudaEventRecord( beginEvent, 0);
    cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_cont, sizeof(long) );
    cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_L, sizeof(int) );
    cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_N, sizeof(int) );
    cudaMemcpy(dev_cont, cont, 1 * sizeof(long), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
    cudaMemcpy(dev_L, L, 10 * sizeof(int), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
    cudaMemcpy(dev_N, N, 256 * sizeof(int), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
    rng<<<1,10>>>(dev_cont, dev_L, dev_N);
    cudaMemcpy(cont, dev_cont, 1 * sizeof(long), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
    cudaMemcpy(N, dev_N, 256 * sizeof(int), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
    cudaEventRecord( endEvent, 0);
    cudaEventSynchronize (endEvent );
    float timevalue;
    cudaEventElapsedTime (&timevalue, beginEvent, endEvent);
    printf("\n\nYou generated a total of %ld numbers", cont[0]);
    printf("\nCUDA Kernel Time: %.2f ms\n", timevalue);
    printf("Your numbers are:");
    for(i=0;i<256;i++)
    {
        printf("%d\t", N[i]);
    }
    cudaFree(dev_cont);
    cudaFree(dev_L);
    cudaFree(dev_N);
    cudaEventDestroy( endEvent );
    cudaEventDestroy( beginEvent );
    return 0;
}

This is the output I receive:

[wigberto@client2 CUDA]$ ./RNG8


You generated a total of 1 numbers
CUDA Kernel Time: 0.00 ms
Your numbers are:614350480      32767   1132936976      11079   2       0       10      0       1293351837      0       -161443660      48      0       0       614350336       32767    1293351836      0       -161444681      48      614350760       32767   1132936976      11079   2       0       10      0       1057178751      0       -161443660      48       155289096       49      614350416       32767   1057178750      0       614350816       32767   614350840       32767   155210544       49      0       0       1132937352       11079   1130370784      11079   1130382061      11079   155289096       49      1130376992      11079   0       1       1610    1       1       1       1130370408      11079    614350896       32767   614350816       32767   1057178751      0       614350840       32767   0       0       -161443150      48      0       0       1132937352      11079    1       11079   0       0       1       0       614351008       32767   614351032       32767   0       0       0       0       0       0       1130369536      1       1132937352       11079   1130370400      11079   614350944       32767   1130369536      11079   1130382061      11079   1130370784      11079   1130365792      11079   6143510880       614351008       32767   -920274837      0       614351032       32767   0       0       -161443150      48      0       0       0       0       1       0       128     0-153802168      48      614350896       32767   1132839104      11079   97      0       88      0       1       0       155249184       49      1130370784      11079   0       0-1      0       1130364928      11079   2464624 0       4198536 0       4198536 0       4197546 0       372297808       0       1130373120      11079   -161427611      48      111079   0       0       1       0       -153802272      48      155249184       49      372297840       0       -1      0       -161404446      48      0       0       0       0372298000       0       372297896       0       372297984       0       0       0       0       0       1130369536      11079   84      0       1130471067      11079   6303744 0614351656       32767   0       0       -1      0       4198536 0       4198536 0       4197546 0       1130397880      11079   0       0       0       0       0       0       00       0       0       -161404446      48      0       0       4198536 0       4198536 0       6303744 0       614351280       32767   6303744 0       614351656       32767   614351640        32767   1       0       4197371 0       0       0       0       0       [wigberto@client2 CUDA]$

@Bardia - Please advise on what is the best thing to do here.

Thanks!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

You can address threads within a block by threadIdx variable. ie., in your case you should probably set

Y = threadIdx.x and then use Y=(a*Y+c)%M

But in general implementing a good RNG on CUDA could be really difficult. So I don't know if you want to implement your own generator just for practice..

Otherwise there is a CURAND library available which provides a number of pseudo- and quasi-random generators, ie. XORWOW, MersenneTwister, Sobol etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply! The idea is that the LCG RNG uses this formula: Y=(a*Y+c)%M. However it requires an original seed (first value of Y) to start producing numbers. The value of that seed (Y) should be a number from 1<Y<M-1. Whichever number you choose means where you will start on the sequence. So if 10 number are generated when Y=1 {5,10,3,6,2,9,11,8,7,4}, if you choose your seed (Y) to be Y=5, then the output of numbers will be the same but starting from position 5 {2,9,11,8,7,4,5,10,3,6}, so if you think of it as an array, the Y will only give you the position from where you will start. –  Wilo Maldonado Jul 30 '12 at 18:14
    
So what I want to do is have multiple threads with different initial seed value. One thread will have Y=1 and produce 1000 numbers, the other one will have Y=1001, etc etc, but once 1,000 numbers are produces that thread needs to stop working so it will not interfere with the next thread producing numbers... I'm pretty sure this makes sense but I have no idea how to tell each thread what to do. –  Wilo Maldonado Jul 30 '12 at 18:20
    
please read above –  Wilo Maldonado Jul 31 '12 at 23:33
    
ok as I understand you want to generate a different subsequences of random numbers for different threads. Maybe this code using CURAND library will help you: global void rng_kernel(int *res, int N, int seed) { unsigned int tid = blockIdx.x * blockDim.x + threadIdx.x; curandState state; // Initialise the RNG curand_init(seed, tid, 0, &state); // generate N random numbers per thread for(int i = 0; i < N; i++) { float x = curand_uniform(&state); res[tid * i] = x; } } –  user1545642 Aug 1 '12 at 5:28
    
where 'seed' is arbitrary and N defines the # of random numbers to generate per thread, and ensure that the array 'res' has enough space to accomodate them. CURAND's default RNG has period about 2^192 so you can use large values of N.. –  user1545642 Aug 1 '12 at 5:31

It should do the same work in all threads, because you want them to do the same work. You should always distinguish threads from each other with addressing them.

For example you should say thread #1 you do this job and save you work here and thread #2 you do that job and save your work there and then go to Host and use that data.

For a two dimensional block grid with two dimension threads in each block I use this code for addressing:

int X = blockIdx.x*blockDim.x+threadIdx.x;
int Y = blockIdx.y*blockDim.y+threadIdx.y;

The X and Y in the code above are the global address of your thread (I think for your a one dimensional grid and thread is sufficient).

Also remember that you can not use the printf function on the kernel. The GPUs can't make any interrupt. For this you can use cuPrintf function which is one of CUDA SDK's samples, but read it's instructions to use it correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
My question is.. how do I tell which thread what to do? –  Wilo Maldonado Jul 30 '12 at 18:21
    
For this algorithm you should send a random filled array to device with cudaMemcpy let's call it Y_dev (these are initial numbers for Y in your algorithm). So in your _global_ code you should have a command like this Y=Y_dev[threadIdx.x] so Y in every thread initializes separately and you will get heterogeneous results from each thread (The size of Y_dev should be equal to the size of your threads). And don't use printf, save it an array and then sent it to device. If you didn't get it I will explain more. –  Bardia Jul 30 '12 at 20:51
    
I see now... but how do I modify my code for that? just add those two lines of code? int Y=threadIdx.x; Y=Y_dev[threadIdx.x]; But how will it know which instruction to run? and where would I add those two commands? –  Wilo Maldonado Jul 31 '12 at 1:59
    
First you should add a command to generate a random array in your main function (The size of array should be equal to the size of your threads you want to use). Then sent it to your device with cudaMemcpy function and then use it in your kernel with adding those two lines in the _global_ function. –  Bardia Jul 31 '12 at 19:37
    
I edited my question to update my current code. Please tell me if this is the proper approach to achieve what I am requesting. Cause I ran it as is but didn't get the results that I expected. –  Wilo Maldonado Aug 1 '12 at 0:21

This answer relates to the edited part of the question.

I didn't notice that it is a recursive Algorithm and unfortunately I don't know how to parallelize a recursive algorithm.

My only idea for generating these 256 number is to generate them separately. i.e. generate 26 of them in the first thread, 26 of them on the second thread and so on. This code will do this (this is only kernel part):

#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>

__global__ void rng(long *cont, int *L, int *N)
{

    int Y=threadIdx.x;
    Y=L[threadIdx.x];
    int a=9, c=3, i;
    long M=256;
    int length=ceil((float)M/10); //256 divided by the number of threads.
    for(i=(threadIdx.x*length);i<length;i++)
    {
        Y=(a*Y+c)%M;
        N[i]=Y;
        cont[0]++;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
And yes, this is a recursive algorithm as many of the random number generators are. However, this person seems to have developed an algorithm to do this LCG Method in parallel with CUDA [link]adnanboz.wordpress.com/tag/nvidia-curand –  Wilo Maldonado Aug 1 '12 at 21:14
    
I corrected the error on defining length. length is the territory of each thread. the approach of link you sent is exactly what I have written. –  Bardia Aug 1 '12 at 21:27
    
Thanks for fixing that. However, the numbers that are being generated do not make any sense. I will edit my original question once again to post the code that I am using and the output that I am receiving –  Wilo Maldonado Aug 1 '12 at 21:39

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