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I have added a document listener to a JTextPane. I want to know what text has been added or removed so I can take action if certain key words are entered. The insert part works just fine, but I do not know how to detect what text was deleted.

The insert works because the text is there and I can select it, but the delete has already removed the text so I get bad location exceptions sometimes.

I want to make reserved words that are not inside quotes bold so I need to know what has been removed, removing even one character (like a quote) could have a huge impact.

My code follows:

    @Override
public void insertUpdate(DocumentEvent e)
{
    Document doc = e.getDocument();
    String i = ""; 

    try
    {
        i = doc.getText(e.getOffset(), e.getLength());
    }
    catch(BadLocationException e1)
    {
        e1.printStackTrace();
    }

    System.out.println("INSERT:" + e + ":" + i);
}

@Override
public void removeUpdate(DocumentEvent e)
{
    Document doc = e.getDocument();
    String i = ""; 

    try
    {
        i = doc.getText(e.getOffset(), e.getLength());
    }
    catch(BadLocationException e1)
    {
        e1.printStackTrace();
    }

    System.out.println("REMOVE:" + e + ":" + i);
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is strange that there is no simple way to get this information.

I've looked at the source code of Swing libraries for this. Of course - there is this information in DocumentEvent, which is of class AbstractDocument$DefaultDocumentEvent, which contains protected Vector<UndoableEdit> edits, which contains one element of type GapContent$RemoveUndo, which contains protected String string that is used only in this class (no other "package" classes get this) and this RemoveUndo class have no getter for this field.

Even toString didn't show it (because RemoveUndo hasn't overrided toString method):

[javax.swing.text.GapContent$RemoveUndo@6303ddfd hasBeenDone: true alive: true]

This is so strange for me that I belive that there is some other easy way to get the removed string and that I just don't know how to accomplish it.

One thing you can do is the most obvious:

    final JTextArea textArea = new JTextArea();
    textArea.addKeyListener(new KeyAdapter() {
        @Override
        public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) {
            previousText = textArea.getText();
        }
    });

    textArea.getDocument().addDocumentListener(new DocumentListener() {
        @Override
        public void removeUpdate(DocumentEvent e) {
            if(previousText != null) {
                String removedStr = previousText.substring(e.getOffset(), e.getOffset() + e.getLength());
                System.out.println(removedStr);
            }
        }
        @Override
        public void insertUpdate(DocumentEvent e) {
        }
        @Override
        public void changedUpdate(DocumentEvent e) {
        }
    });

where previousText is an instance variable.

or (the most nasty ever):

textArea.getDocument().addDocumentListener(new DocumentListener() {
        @Override
        public void removeUpdate(DocumentEvent e) {
            String removedString = getRemovedString(e);
            System.out.println(removedString);
        }

        @Override
        public void insertUpdate(DocumentEvent e) {
        }

        @Override
        public void changedUpdate(DocumentEvent e) {
        }
    });

plus this method:

public static String getRemovedString(DocumentEvent e) {
    try {
        Field editsField = null;
        Field[] fields = CompoundEdit.class.getDeclaredFields();
        for(Field f : fields) {
            if(f.getName().equals("edits")) {
                editsField = f;
                break;
            }
        }
        editsField.setAccessible(true);
        List edits = (List) editsField.get(e);
        if(edits.size() != 1) {
            return null;
        }

        Class<?> removeUndo = null;
        for(Class<?> c : GapContent.class.getDeclaredClasses()) {
            if(c.getSimpleName().equals("RemoveUndo")) {
                removeUndo = c;
                break;
            }
        }

        Object removeUndoInstance = edits.get(0);
        fields = removeUndo.getDeclaredFields();

        Field stringField = null;
        for(Field f : fields) {
            if(f.getName().equals("string")) {
                stringField = f;
                break;
            }
        }

        stringField.setAccessible(true);
        return (String) stringField.get(removeUndoInstance);
    }
    catch(SecurityException e1) {
        e1.printStackTrace();
    }
    catch(IllegalArgumentException e1) {
        e1.printStackTrace();
    }
    catch(IllegalAccessException e1) {
        e1.printStackTrace();
    }
    return null;
}
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That is nasty. :) Not sure what I will do in the end but thanks a bunch for the effort. –  BigMac66 Aug 7 '12 at 15:43

I had the same problem than you. And what Xeon explained help me a lot too. But after, i found a way to do that. In my case, i created a custom StyledDocument class that extends DefaultStyledDocument:

   public class CustomStyledDocument extends DefaultStyledDocument
    {


        public CustomStyledDocument () {
           super();
    }

     @Override
        public void insertString(int offset, String string, AttributeSet as) throws BadLocationException {
            super.insertString(offset, string, as);
    }

    @Override
        public void remove(int offset, int i1) throws BadLocationException { 
        String previousText = getText(offset, i1);
        super.remove(offset, i1);
    }

}

So if you call getText method before you call super.remove(...), you will get the previous text.

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