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how can i delete columns beginning and ending with parenthesis in a file

Expectd Input - content of input.txt

ABC (BCD) EFG    
BCD (ABC) (BCD) 
DEF  BCD (ABC)  
EFG HI(JKL)
ABC EFG (HI JK) LMN

Expectd Output -- content of output.txt

ABC EFG    
BCD    
DEF BCD
EFG HI(JKL)    
ABC EFG LMN

Just thought id add one more sample input for clarity.

ABC (lll) INTEGER NOT NULL -3
EDG (FK) (lll) INTEGER NOT NULL -3
HIJ (nn ooo) CHAR(16) NOT NULL 'Not Provided'
KLM (ppp) VARCHAR(75) NOT NULL 'Not Provided'
NOP (qqq) VARCHAR(75) NOT NULL 'Not Provided'
QARD (rrr) DATE NOT NULL '1900-01-01'
QRS (sss) DATE NOT NULL '1900-01-01'
TUV  DATE NOT NULL '1900-01-01'
WXY (uuu) CHAR(1) NOT NULL 'N'
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Just to make it clear: do you expect it to match (ABC) on the beginning or end of the line? –  Michał Górny Jul 27 '12 at 21:59
    
text withing brackets is possible at the end of the line but I dont expect it to be in the beginning. My input is basically a ddl. –  user973363 Jul 27 '12 at 22:09
    
the text within the brackets is what seperated the column name from the datatypes in this ddl. –  user973363 Jul 27 '12 at 22:15
    
Ah, now I see one more problem. Can the text ever contain parentheses? Something like 'Not Provided (abc) whatever'? –  Michał Górny Jul 28 '12 at 7:24

3 Answers 3

Usage
awk '{print $0" "}' foo.txt | awk -f foo.awk

foo.awk

BEGIN {
    RS=ORS=" "
}

{
    n=length($0)
    if (!n) next
    split($0, s, "")
}

s[1]=="(" && s[n]==")" {
    # it is column like (abcd), skip it
    next
}

s[1]=="(" {
    # stop printing
    f=1
}

!f {
    print $0
}

s[n]==")" {
    # start printing again
    f=0
}
share|improve this answer
    
this works perfect except that my input file unfortunately has one line like so ABC EFG (HI JK) LMN. WOuld it be possibe to get the out put for this like also as ABC EFG LMN. Thanks!! –  user973363 Jul 27 '12 at 20:46
1  
Nice concept but it will fail to match parentheses adhering to the newlines. –  Michał Górny Jul 27 '12 at 20:46
    
@MichałGórny I am trying to fix it in the updated version. –  slitvinov Jul 27 '12 at 20:57
    
@slitvinov: I've modified your code but it got a bit complex... –  Michał Górny Jul 27 '12 at 21:20
    
@slitvinov: I am not getting the output using Michał Górny answer –  user973363 Jul 27 '12 at 21:43

Based on the solution from @slitvinov:

BEGIN {
    RS = "[[:space:]]"
    ORS = ""
    eat = 0
}

/^\(.*\)$/ {
    next
}

/^\(/ {
    eat = 1
    next
}

/\)$/ {
    if (eat) {
        eat = 0
        next
    }
}

{
    if (eat)
        next
    print $0 RT
}

That to an .awk file and awk -f foo.awk foo.txt gives:

ABC EFG    
BCD 
DEF  BCD  
EFG HI(JKL)
ABC EFG LMN

But I think it could be done simpler...

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it doesnt seem to be working for me. It is just giving me back the input as is. –  user973363 Jul 27 '12 at 21:36
    
@user973363: That's weird. I would understand if it'd just collapse the output (that's what POSIX awk would do) but giving back suggests it didn't get the regexp to match... –  Michał Górny Jul 27 '12 at 21:48

The simplest thing that I can assemble is:

perl -pe 'BEGIN { undef $<; } s/\s(\(.*?\)(\s))+/\2/cgs' foo.txt

Sorry for Perl but it's in POSIX and it has regular expressions powerful enough to cover the case.

Ah, and it can't handle if the file starts with a parenthesis. If it ends with one, it's fine as long as there's newline after it. If that's a problem, then the easiest solution would be to just add a temporary space.

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