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Working toward making a small command line script in Ruby, where the user provides a few pieces of information related to restaurants, and computed info gets returned.

Currently I have the following code:

class Restaurant
 attr_accessor :name :type :avg_price
 def initialize(name, type, avg_price)
   @name = name
   @type = type
   @avg_price = price
 end
 end

Question 1

If we used attr_accessors method to declare type, and price, and name Why is the Initialize method necessary? Is this because we need to set the inputed values to it?

Question 2

In the code their is a sub-class called RestaurantList followed by < Array, What is the function of this?

The Array class is not defined in the code? Is it a built in class in ruby called Array? If so, what exactly does it do?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Question 1

The attr_accessor method is a short cut to declaring variable accessible outside the block within the method.

The initializer method in ruby is the method to be called when someone initializes something of that class, i.e. chipotle = Restaurant.new 'Chipotle', 'Mexican', 8.00

Question 2

Array is indeed a class built into Ruby, (built in classes generally referred to as the Ruby Standard Library, see here for the MRI 1.9.3 documentation on the Array class. You do not need to do any kind of special inheritance in order the use the Array class though. The language is defined in a manor such that things such as string, hashes, arrays, and other commonly used classes do not need to be inherited.

That said, these are able to be overloaded. Don't be surprised the day you find something that looks like an array but has alternate functionality.

Other Notes

One thing to keep in mind when you approach Ruby programming is that everything is an object. You will often hear this but it difficult to comprehend when you first dive but still important to keep in mind that everything can be mapped back to the Object class in Ruby, see here for documentation on the Object class.

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Thank you so much, It is very clear now. how long did it take you to learn to program with ruby by yourself? thank you. –  RubyBeginner Jul 27 '12 at 21:42
    
@user1556385 It took me about 4 months to learn Ruby, to give a little more perspective it took me about a month to learn php. I defiantly do not have as good of a handle on it still as I would like (specifically the ability to utilize Ruby meta programming effectively), but remember everyone learns at their own rate. Most people I have talked about learning Ruby describe the day "it just clicked", just keep at it, keep posting on stack (the community here is really great!) and one day it will just click! –  rudolph9 Jul 27 '12 at 22:12
    
Thank you so much for lighting my day, I'm a smart student, did good job using C language long time ago in 2005, with ruby it looked to me like PHP when i watched Lynda.com training class. a guy from ukraine wrote me a simple yet functional class script to add restaurant and type and price on command line and then print the list on screen, it was so clear to get idea of OOP and how to use the method for actions and actions start when he wrote the loop do statment. With Lynda.com dvd, i got confused the only difference than the guy code that lynda script used txt file to store it with search –  RubyBeginner Jul 27 '12 at 22:53
    
@user1556385 Hey no problem! Maybe +1 my answer if you have the privilege... –  rudolph9 Jul 27 '12 at 23:05
    
I did, but it says i don't have the Reputition or something, Once i get to that level I'll make sure i do it. i already tried to do it before you notice that. –  RubyBeginner Jul 28 '12 at 3:23
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