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I wan to do a linear regression in R using the lm() function. My data is an annual time series with one field for year (22 years) and another for state (50 states). I want to fit a regression for each state so that at the end I have a vector of lm responses. I can imagine doing for loop for each state then doing the regression inside the loop and adding the results of each regression to a vector. That does not seem very R-like, however. In SAS I would do a 'by' statement and in SQL I would do a 'group by'. What's the R way of doing this?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Here's one way using the lme4 package.

> library(lme4)
> d <- data.frame(state=rep(c('NY', 'CA'), c(10, 10)),
+                 year=rep(1:10, 2),
+                 response=c(rnorm(10), rnorm(10)))

> xyplot(response ~ year, groups=state, data=d, type='l')

> fits <- lmList(response ~ year | state, data=d)
> fits
Call: lmList(formula = response ~ year | state, data = d)
Coefficients:
   (Intercept)        year
CA -1.34420990  0.17139963
NY  0.00196176 -0.01852429

Degrees of freedom: 20 total; 16 residual
Residual standard error: 0.8201316
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Is there a way to list R2 for both of these two models? e.g. add an R2 column after year. Also add p-value for each of the coeff? –  ToToRo Aug 27 '14 at 15:52

Here's an approach using the plyr package:

d <- data.frame(
  state = rep(c('NY', 'CA'), 10),
  year = rep(1:10, 2),
  response= rnorm(20)
)

library(plyr)
# Break up d by state, then fit the specified model to each piece and
# return a list
models <- dlply(d, "state", function(df) 
  lm(response ~ year, data = df))

# Apply coef to each model and return a data frame
ldply(models, coef)

# Print the summary of each model
l_ply(models, summary, .print = TRUE)
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Say you added a additional independent variable that wasn't available in all states (i.e. miles.of.ocean.shoreline) that was represented by NA in your data. Wouldn't the lm call fail? How could it be dealt with? –  MikeTP Mar 14 '13 at 1:58
    
Inside the function you'd need to test for that case and use a different formula –  hadley Mar 14 '13 at 15:24
    
Is it possible to add the name of the subgroup to each call in the summary (last step)? –  beetroot Apr 16 '14 at 9:31

In my opinion is a mixed linear model a better approach for this kind of data. The code below given in the fixed effect the overall trend. The random effects indicate how the trend for each individual state differ from the global trend. The correlation structure takes the temporal autocorrelation into account. Have a look at Pinheiro & Bates (Mixed Effects Models in S and S-Plus).

library(nlme)
lme(response ~ year, random = ~year|state, correlation = corAR1(~year))
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1  
This is a really good general stats theory answer which makes me think about some things I had not considered. The application which caused me to ask the question would not be applicable to this solution, but I'm glad you brought it up. Thank you. –  JD Long Jul 24 '09 at 14:11
1  
It's not a good idea to start with a mixed model - how do you know that any of the assumptions are warranted? –  hadley Jul 31 '09 at 19:26
4  
One should check the assumption by model validation (and knowledge of the data). BTW you cannot warrant the assumption on the individual lm's either. You would have to validate all models seperately. –  Thierry Jul 31 '09 at 22:59
## make fake data
> ngroups <- 2
> group <- 1:ngroups
> nobs <- 100
> dta <- data.frame(group=rep(group,each=nobs),y=rnorm(nobs*ngroups),x=runif(nobs*ngroups))
> head(dta)
  group          y         x
1     1  0.6482007 0.5429575
2     1 -0.4637118 0.7052843
3     1 -0.5129840 0.7312955
4     1 -0.6612649 0.9028034
5     1 -0.5197448 0.1661308
6     1  0.4240346 0.8944253
> 
> ## function to extract the results of one model
> foo <- function(z) {
+   ## coef and se in a data frame
+   mr <- data.frame(coef(summary(lm(y~x,data=z))))
+   ## put row names (predictors/indep variables)
+   mr$predictor <- rownames(mr)
+   mr
+ }
> ## see that it works
> foo(subset(dta,group==1))
              Estimate Std..Error   t.value  Pr...t..   predictor
(Intercept)  0.2176477  0.1919140  1.134090 0.2595235 (Intercept)
x           -0.3669890  0.3321875 -1.104765 0.2719666           x
> ## one option: use command by
> res <- by(dta,dta$group,foo)
> res
dta$group: 1
              Estimate Std..Error   t.value  Pr...t..   predictor
(Intercept)  0.2176477  0.1919140  1.134090 0.2595235 (Intercept)
x           -0.3669890  0.3321875 -1.104765 0.2719666           x
------------------------------------------------------------ 
dta$group: 2
               Estimate Std..Error    t.value  Pr...t..   predictor
(Intercept) -0.04039422  0.1682335 -0.2401081 0.8107480 (Intercept)
x            0.06286456  0.3020321  0.2081387 0.8355526           x
> ## using package plyr is better
> library(plyr)
> res <- ddply(dta,"group",foo)
> res
  group    Estimate Std..Error    t.value  Pr...t..   predictor
1     1  0.21764767  0.1919140  1.1340897 0.2595235 (Intercept)
2     1 -0.36698898  0.3321875 -1.1047647 0.2719666           x
3     2 -0.04039422  0.1682335 -0.2401081 0.8107480 (Intercept)
4     2  0.06286456  0.3020321  0.2081387 0.8355526           x
>
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The lm() function above is an simple example. By the way, I imagine that your database has the columns as in the following form:

year state var1 var2 y...

In my point of view, you can to use the following code:

require(base) 
library(base) 
attach(data) # data = your data base
             #state is your label for the states column
modell<-by(data, data$state, function(data) lm(y~I(1/var1)+I(1/var2)))
summary(modell)
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