Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have to write definition of the code below. I undarstand some basics of OOP Cpp, I know what is *x or &x, but that's not enough... The main fact is that i cant understand line B* p = new D, m, *k; i cant understand what m and *k stand for.

class B {
  public: 
    virtual void msg() { cout << "classB"; }
};

class D: public B {
   public: 
     virtual void msg() { cout << "classD"; }
};

int main() {
  B* p = new D, m, *k;
  p->msg(); k = &m; k->msg();
  . . .
}

Help, if you can explain how (and why so) this code will work.

thanks, for your time.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It declares multiple variables at once. This is basically the same as:

B *p = new D;
B  m;
B *k;

So p is a pointer to an instance of D allocated with new. m is a local instance of class B and k is a pointer to B that is later assigned to point at m.

The msg function is called on both allocated objects via the pointers p and k.

Note that * applies to each variable declaration separately. So B* a, b; doesn't declare two pointers, but instead declares one pointer and one local object. This is the reason, that many people prefer to write the * directly in front of the variable name: B *a, b makes this a bit more obvious.

share|improve this answer

In C++ you can declare more then one variable in one statement. Therefore B* p = new D, m, *k; declares the variables p, m and k. The * for pointer declarations binds to the variable name, therefore it's basically identical to

B* p = new D;
B m;
B* k;
share|improve this answer

Nothing fancy, it's just plain old C.

B* p = new D, m, *k;

is just shortcut for:

B* p = new D;
B m;
B* k; 
share|improve this answer

p is a pointer to an object of the class B (or D, because it is a child of the class B). p->msg(); is similar to (*p).msg();. m is an object of the class B, so we can get pointer to it by & operator and store it in k (which is a pointer to an object of the class B).

And

B* p = new D, m, *k;

is just

B* p = new D;
B m;
B* k;

Notice: you should put * if it is needed each time

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.