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I'd like to write an interpreter and tracing JIT for a programming language I'm designing. I already have many years of experience programming in C++, but I've been wondering if perhaps newer alternatives might be better. One of the things I found most frustrating, back in my C++ days, was having to use header files to deal with the clunky one-pass compiler model. The problem is that not all languages are equally suited for this purpose. For my tracing JIT, I need to be able to write executable code into memory and have the interpreter call to that code. I will also need the generated code to be able to call back into host functions.

I started looking at Go and saw that the language had pointers but no pointer arithmetic. This immediately struck me as a huge issue. I may well want to write my own allocator and garbage collector. I will need to closely control the way my language objects are laid out in memory and be able to get the address of specific fields and write to them. Unless there's ways to deal with this, it kind of seems like Go fails to be low-level enough for my purposes.

The D language seems promising. It has pointer arithmetic and a clear outline of the ABI needed to call in and out of D. I've heard lots of good things about it. It also has garbage collection which is nice for compiler writing, but I still have a few things I'm not sure about:

  1. Does D have standard libs that will allow me to mark chunks of memory as executable?

  2. If I allocate a big chunk of memory that I want to manage myself, with my own GC, and have a bunch of pointers going into there, will this pose problems with D's garbage collector?

  3. How well does D interoperate with C code, in your experience? Is loading C dynamic libraries and calling into them fairly easy?

Finally, there's the whole support aspect. For those who have used D on linux here, how good is the toolchain? Any issues? Has anyone written a JIT compiler in D, and if so, how was the experience?

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You can do a JIT in almost any modern language: Go, D, C#, Haskell, Java, Python, Ruby, etc. You might need to write small chunks of glue code in C, but it's definitely not necessary to have pointer arithmetic to write a JIT. You only need mprotect/mmap to mark regions as executable, and that can be done from any language. –  Dietrich Epp Jul 27 '12 at 21:23

4 Answers 4

There is already a JIT compiler, very serious one, done in D. I highly recommend taking a look at http://lycus.org/ , more specifically pages about the MCI project - http://github.com/lycus/mci . MCI documentation will give you some more information. As you will see, MCI is more than just a JIT, it has its own (better than anything else I have seen) IR, optimizer, verifier, etc...

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Maybe I'm looking in the wrong places, but just glancing at the code there doesn't appear to be a JIT at all. The src/mpi/jit directory is empty and I can't see much else anywhere. –  Peter Alexander Jul 28 '12 at 0:27

I started looking at Go and saw that the language had pointers but no pointer arithmetic. This immediately struck me as a huge issue.

You, obviously, haven't tried the language. It works pretty well without any "pointer arithmetic". If you really need to bend rules, there is always "unsafe" package that will allow you to do anything.

I may well want to write my own allocator and garbage collector. I will need to closely control the way my language objects are laid out in memory and be able to get the address of specific fields and write to them.

I haven't written allocatior or garbage collector myself, but you can take address of a field of a structure. All Go data structures are simple and easy to control and reason about. See http://research.swtch.com/godata for short introduction. Also size and aligment guarantees are part of the language http://golang.org/ref/spec#Size_and_alignment_guarantees. If nothing else, you could always jump into C or asm.

IMHO, you should try to implement some small task to see if Go fits your requirements. Feel free to ask questions at http://groups.google.com/group/golang-nuts.

Alex

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Go does allow pointer arithmetic, but you must import the unsafe package to do so (or use a C function). Pointer arithmetic is a common source of bugs, and Go has other mechanisms, like slices, which provide safe ways to do some of the same activities that require pointer arithmetic in C. With unsafe you can cast any pointer to a uintptr and back, and uintptr is an ordinary numeric type, which allows you do do arithmetic.

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How do you cast a pointer to a function in Go? I tried something like (func ()int)(code) but it says I cannot cast from a pointer to a function. –  MrOrdinaire Jan 15 '13 at 17:51
    
You can't get a pointer to a defined function but you can get a pointer to a variable with a function type. See play.golang.org/p/VfFmRFfmJV (it doesn't execute in the playground due to the unsafe import). –  Matt Jan 17 '13 at 15:55
  1. I believe so, see core.memory.GC if I remember right.

  2. No, it shouldn't. Just call malloc or whatever you need, and make sure the GC doesn't see it.

  3. Yes, it's pretty easy to interoperate with C code.

Caveat: You probably don't want to rely on the GC either, since it's not 'precise' (i.e. can and does leak memory if you're unlucky). But for small blocks of data it's usually fine.

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