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I have two arrays. One is a list of lengths within the other. For example

zarray = [1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10]

and

lengths = [1 3 2 1 3]

I want to average (mean) over parts the first array with lengths given by the second. For this example, resulting in:

[mean([1]),mean([2,3,4]),mean([5,6]),mean([7]),mean([8,9,10])]

I am trying to avoid looping, for the sake of speed. I tried using mat2cell and cellfun as follows

zcell = mat2cell(zarray,[1],lengths);
zcellsum = cellfun('mean',zcell);

But the cellfun part is very slow. Is there a way to do this without looping or cellfun?

share|improve this question
    
I don't think there is a fast way to do this in pure matlab. It is, however, a good candidate for a simple mex extension. – Isaac Jul 27 '12 at 21:47
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is a fully vectorized solution (no explicit for-loops, or hidden loops with ARRAYFUN, CELLFUN, ..). The idea is to use the extremely fast ACCUMARRAY function:

%# data
zarray = [1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10];
lengths = [1 3 2 1 3];

%# generate subscripts: 1 2 2 2 3 3 4 5 5 5
endLocs = cumsum(lengths(:));
subs = zeros(endLocs(end),1);
subs([1;endLocs(1:end-1)+1]) = 1;
subs = cumsum(subs);

%# mean of each part
means = accumarray(subs, zarray) ./ lengths(:)

The result in this case:

means =
            1
            3
          5.5
            7
            9

Speed test:

Consider the following comparison of the different methods. I am using the TIMEIT function by Steve Eddins:

function [t,v] = testMeans()
    %# generate test data
    [arr,len] = genData();

    %# define functions
    f1 = @() func1(arr,len);
    f2 = @() func2(arr,len);
    f3 = @() func3(arr,len);
    f4 = @() func4(arr,len);

    %# timeit
    t(1) = timeit( f1 );
    t(2) = timeit( f2 );
    t(3) = timeit( f3 );
    t(4) = timeit( f4 );

    %# return results to check their validity
    v{1} = f1();
    v{2} = f2();
    v{3} = f3();
    v{4} = f4();
end

function [arr,len] = genData()
    %#arr = [1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10];
    %#len = [1 3 2 1 3];

    numArr = 10000;     %# number of elements in array
    numParts = 500;     %# number of parts/regions      
    arr = rand(1,numArr);
    len = zeros(1,numParts);
    len(1:end-1) = diff(sort( randperm(numArr,numParts) ));
    len(end) = numArr - sum(len);
end

function m = func1(arr, len)
    %# @Drodbar: for-loop
    idx = 1;
    N = length(len);
    m = zeros(1,N);
    for i=1:N
        m(i) = mean( arr(idx+(0:len(i)-1)) );
        idx = idx + len(i);
    end
end

function m = func2(arr, len)
    %# @user1073959: MAT2CELL+CELLFUN
    m = cellfun(@mean, mat2cell(arr, 1, len));
end

function m = func3(arr, len)
    %# @Drodbar: ARRAYFUN+CELLFUN
    idx = arrayfun(@(a,b) a-(0:b-1), cumsum(len), len, 'UniformOutput',false);
    m = cellfun(@(a) mean(arr(a)), idx);
end

function m = func4(arr, len)
    %# @Amro: ACCUMARRAY
    endLocs = cumsum(len(:));
    subs = zeros(endLocs(end),1);
    subs([1;endLocs(1:end-1)+1]) = 1;
    subs = cumsum(subs);

    m = accumarray(subs, arr) ./ len(:);
    if isrow(len)
        m = m';
    end
end

Below are the timings. Tests were performed on a WinXP 32-bit machine with MATLAB R2012a. My method is an order of magnitude faster than all other methods. For-loop is second best.

>> [t,v] = testMeans();
>> t
t =
   0.013098   0.013074   0.022407   0.00031807
    |           |          |          \_________ @Amro: ACCUMARRAY (!)
    |           |           \___________________ @Drodbar: ARRAYFUN+CELLFUN
    |            \______________________________ @user1073959: MAT2CELL+CELLFUN
     \__________________________________________ @Drodbar: FOR-loop

Furthermore all results are correct and equal -- differences are in the order of eps the machine precision (caused by different ways of accumulating round-off errors), therefore considered rubbish and simply ignored:

%#assert( isequal(v{:}) )
>> maxErr = max(max( diff(vertcat(v{:})) ))
maxErr =
   3.3307e-16
share|improve this answer
    
I can just agree with you, extremely fast ACCUMARRAY :) good comparison! – Drodbar Jul 29 '12 at 20:18

Here is a solution using arrayfun and cellfun

zarray  = [1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10];
lengths = [1 3 2 1 3];

% Generate the indexes for the elements contained within each length specified
% subset. idx would be {[1], [4, 3, 2], [6, 5], [7], [10, 9, 8]} in this case
idx = arrayfun(@(a,b) a-(0:b-1), cumsum(lengths), lengths,'UniformOutput',false);
means = cellfun( @(a) mean(zarray(a)), idx);

Your desired output result:

means =

    1.0000    3.0000    5.5000    7.0000    9.0000

Following @tmpearce comment I did a quick time performance comparison between above's solution, from which I create a function called subsetMeans1

function means = subsetMeans1( zarray, lengths)

% Generate the indexes for the elements contained within each length specified
% subset. idx would be {[1], [4, 3, 2], [6, 5], [7], [10, 9, 8]} in this case
idx = arrayfun(@(a,b) a-(0:b-1), cumsum(lengths), lengths,'UniformOutput',false);
means = cellfun( @(a) mean(zarray(a)), idx);

and a simple for loop alternative, function subsetMeans2.

function means = subsetMeans2( zarray, lengths)

% Method based on single loop
idx = 1;
N = length(lengths);
means = zeros( 1, N);
for i = 1:N
    means(i) = mean( zarray(idx+(0:lengths(i)-1)) );
    idx = idx+lengths(i);
end

Using the next test scrip, based on TIMEIT, that allows checking performance varying the number of elements on the input vector and sizes of elements per subset:

% Generate some data for the performance test

% Total of elements on the vector to test
nVec = 100000;

% Max of elements per subset
nSubset = 5;

% Data generation aux variables
lenghtsGen = randi( nSubset, 1, nVec);
accumLen = cumsum(lenghtsGen);
maxIdx = find( accumLen < nVec, 1, 'last' );

% % Original test data
% zarray  = [1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10];
% lengths = [1 3 2 1 3];

% Vector to test
zarray = 1:nVec;
lengths = [ lenghtsGen(1:maxIdx) nVec-accumLen(maxIdx)] ;

% Double check that nVec is will be the max index
assert ( sum(lengths) == nVec)

t1(1) = timeit(@() subsetMeans1( zarray, lengths));
t1(2) = timeit(@() subsetMeans2( zarray, lengths));

fprintf('Time spent subsetMeans1: %f\n',t1(1));
fprintf('Time spent subsetMeans2: %f\n',t1(2));

It turns out that the non-vectorised version without arrayfun and cellfun is faster, presumably due to the extra overhead of those functions

Time spent subsetMeans1: 2.082457
Time spent subsetMeans2: 1.278473
share|improve this answer
    
Can you do a speed test of this vs. a simple loop? – tmpearce Jul 28 '12 at 15:10
    
I posted a fully-vectorized solution using ACCUMARRAY, along with a comparison against the other methods – Amro Jul 29 '12 at 15:41

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