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I have some periodic processing that I want to perform. I'm setting it up like this:

periodicHandler = new Handler(new Handler.Callback()
{
    public boolean handleMessage(Message msg)
    {
        doPeriodicStuff();

        // schedule the next call
        periodicHandler.sendEmptyMessageDelayed(0, PERIODIC_INTERVAL);

        return true;
    }
});

// schedule the initial call
periodicHandler.sendEmptyMessageDelayed(0, INITIAL_DELAY);

I have a couple of questions:

  • Will these handlers fire when the app is in the background? (If not, will any expired handlers fire when the app comes back to the foreground?)
  • Will these queued messages keep the app "alive"? That is, does the presence of these queued messages prevent Android from killing the application, even if all the activities are gone?
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2 Answers 2

Will these queued messages keep the app "alive"? That is, does the presence of these queued messages prevent Android from killing the application, even if all the activities are gone?

No. Android can and will terminate your process when it wishes.

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I understand that Android can kill anything anytime it wants. My question is whether the presence of these queued messages has any effect on whether Android chooses to kill my app. That is, would termination be less likely, more likely, or the same as an app that wasn't using this kind of periodic processing mechanism? –  Kristopher Johnson Jul 28 '12 at 18:49

You should consider using a service. It's better at maintaining background tasks, and you can configure it to only stop running in extreme low-memory situations.

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Actually, I don't want the background tasks to keep running if the app is "gone". I'm hoping that the queued messages don't keep the app running. –  Kristopher Johnson Jul 27 '12 at 21:42
    
I'd still use a service. You can tell the service to shut itself down in your app's onDestroy method, so it won't continue to run. –  D_Steve595 Jul 27 '12 at 21:57

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