Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I currently have a class where I am storing a static collection that gets objects added and removed as certain methods are called. Here is the current code:

public class MatchMaker : Hub
    {

    private static HashSet<SoloUser> soloUsers = new HashSet<SoloUser>();

     //Client Requests
    public void findNewPartner(string Name, string Country)
    {

        SoloUser soloUser = soloUsers.Users.FirstOrDefault(s => (s.Name == Name) && (s.Country == Major));
        if (soloUsers.Users.Count > 0){
            Clients.partnerRequestResult(soloUsers.Users.FirstOrDefault());
            soloUsers.Users.Remove(soloUser);
            Process currentProcess = System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess();
            long totalBytesOfMemoryUsed = currentProcess.WorkingSet64;
            Debug.WriteLine("TotalMemoryUsed: " + totalBytesOfMemoryUsed);
        }
        else
        {
            soloUser = new SoloUser { 
                Name = Name,
                Country = Country                       
            };
            soloUsers.Users.Add(soloUser);
            Process currentProcess = System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess();
            long totalBytesOfMemoryUsed = currentProcess.WorkingSet64;
            Debug.WriteLine("TotalMemoryUsed: " + totalBytesOfMemoryUsed);
        }



    }
}

When I run:

Process currentProcess = System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess();
long totalBytesOfMemoryUsed = currentProcess.WorkingSet64;
Debug.WriteLine("TotalMemoryUsed: " + totalBytesOfMemoryUsed);

an object is added or removed from the collection the output of totalBytesOfMemoryUsed gets larger and larger(by 2mb each time) whether or not i add or remove the object from the collection, is this due to a memory leak? Is this even a sufficient way to check memory management? Do i need to dispose an object when i remove it from the collection?

share|improve this question
    
You should dispose any objects that implement IDisposable as soon as you are finished with them. Can you post more relevant code for your static collection? –  Bryan Crosby Jul 27 '12 at 23:08
1  
When there is memory pressure the garbage collector will run. –  asawyer Jul 27 '12 at 23:08
    
@BryanCrosby added a little more code if it helps you better understand –  anthonypliu Jul 27 '12 at 23:13
    
@asawyer so your saying if the memory reaches a pressuring limit, the garbage collector will run and reduce the memory usage, granted that its just a bunch of disposable objects left in memory? –  anthonypliu Jul 27 '12 at 23:14
    
@anthonypliu I suggest reading more on how the .Net gc works, it's pretty interesting. –  asawyer Jul 27 '12 at 23:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It is a good practice to dispose of any objects that implement IDisposable as soon as you are finished with them.

Given that, you need to remember that the .NET Garbage Collector is non-deterministic. This means you aren't going to necessarily know beforehand when a collection is going to occur. When the run-time needs to perform a collection, it will try and do that. You shouldn't be afraid of 2mb anyways. Let the Garbage Collector do it's job.

Trying to analyze your program's memory usage by getting the working set of memory or looking at the Windows Task Manager is usually a trip down the rabbit hole. Use a memory profiler after you actually have a problem (such as ANTS).

I also suggest reading MSDN regarding the Garbage Collector in general. You can start here.

share|improve this answer

There is probably not enough information here to comment on memory leaks, but in the general case - put your trust in the Garbage Collector.
If you still suspect of a memory leak, use a memory profiler (such as ANTS or dotTrace).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.