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I'm having a problem with understanding the LIKE and NOT LIKE operators in SQL. This is a query that I've executed:

select serial_number from UNIT U 
group by serial_number
order by serial_number

which yields 2000 results.

When I execute this query, I get 1950 results:

select serial_number from UNIT U 
WHERE op_name LIKE 'Assembly'
group by serial_number
order by serial_number

So when I execute this query, I expect to get 50 results, but instead I get 2000:

select serial_number from UNIT U 
WHERE op_name NOT LIKE 'Assembly'
group by serial_number
order by serial_number

Any explanations? Thanks a bunch.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The group you're doing makes it not really valid to do the sort of count comparison you're attempting. Suppose you have 10 unique serial numbers, and for each of those serial numbers there are two rows (so 20 rows total), one with op_name "Xyz", and another with op_name "Assembly". Your first query would return 10 rows. Your second query would return 10 rows. Your third query would return 10 rows. Because of the group, LIKE "Assembly" and NOT LIKE "Assembly" are not mutually exclusive.

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Thanks, I realized the contradiction went away when I took away the group by's. I'm not quite sure how to fix it since I need the group by's to get only distinct serial numbers, but it's a start. –  user1558927 Jul 28 '12 at 0:22
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NULL is neither LIKE nor NOT LIKE anything.


Actually, re-reading your numbers more carefully, there may be another cause. (My earlier point is true, but this is more likely.)

Suppose you have the following data:

serial_number | op_name
--------------+---------
1             | Assembly
1             | Not

1 will be returned by both queries.

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Yeah that too! :-) –  richard Jul 28 '12 at 0:09
    
Hmmm I don't think the op_name is called not. Just for further info, the same thing happens if I do op_name = 'Assembly' and op_name != 'Assembly' instead of LIKE and NOT LIKE –  user1558927 Jul 28 '12 at 0:12
    
@user1558927, op_name='Assembly' and op_name like 'Assembly' are completely equivalent (and same for != and NOT LIKE) so you should expect the same thing to happen. –  hatchet Jul 28 '12 at 0:20
    
@user1558927 The string Not is meaningless, except to be not Assembly in this example. This is meant to demonstrate that the same serial_number will be in the output group whether you use LIKE/= or NOT LIKE/!=. –  ephemient Jul 28 '12 at 0:37
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Without the wildcards % your LIKE operates just like an =.

Check and see what the values are...most likely if you are using LIKE, you also want to use wildcards for example:

select serial_number from UNIT U WHERE op_name NOT LIKE '%Assembly%' group by serial_number order by serial_number

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