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I have a folder containing several text files. How would I go about using python to make a copy of everyone of those files and put the copies in a new folder?

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2  
What have you tried so far? It's easier to help when we know what you have done up to this point. – Levon Jul 28 '12 at 0:44
import shutil
shutil.copytree("abc", "copy of abc")

Source: docs.python.org

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You can use the glob module to select your .txt files:

import os, shutil, glob

dst = 'path/of/destination/directory'
try:
    os.makedirs(dst) # create destination directory, if needed (similar to mkdir -p)
except OSError:
    # The directory already existed, nothing to do
    pass
for txt_file in glob.iglob('*.txt'):
    shutil.copy2(txt_file, dst)

The glob module only contains 2 functions: glob and iglob (see documentation). They both find all the pathnames matching a specified pattern according to the rules used by the Unix shell, but glob.glob returns a list and glob.iglob returns a generator.

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makedirs(dst) fails if the destination already exists, unlike mkdir -p – Matthew Moisen Jan 26 at 1:18
    
Good catch. I added exception handling around it. – Balthazar Rouberol Mar 3 at 12:56

Use shutil.copyfile

import shutil
shutil.copyfile(src, dst)
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I would suggest looking at this post: How do I copy a file in python?

ls_dir = os.listdir(src_path)    
for file in ls_dir:
    copyfile(file, dest_path)

That should do it.

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1  
os.system is discouraged; subprocess.call is a recommended alternative: docs.python.org/library/subprocess#replacing-os-system – Tshepang Jul 28 '12 at 1:05
1  
In this case, neither should be used. Python can read a directory listing just fine (and in a way that handles whitespace in filenames). os.listdir() – jordanm Jul 28 '12 at 2:06
    
Thank you for the feedback @Tshepang and jordanm. I updated my suggested answer accordingly. – cloksmith Jul 29 '12 at 5:34
    
Unless you will need ls_dir again, you can shorten this to for file in os.listdir(src_path). I would also rather you avoid using a word like file for an arbitrary variable, since file() is a built-in function. – Tshepang Jul 29 '12 at 7:39

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