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Im trying to improve my code structure so perhaps i could get some input on the following points and questions regarding how to handle primarily services.

  1. A service should not be dependent on the presentation layer, so passing stuff like httpcontext into service / service functions through constructor and similar is a bad practice, correct?

  2. Should one not have services referencing each other? Should they only work 'downward' like for example repository dependency? Or that is considered ok?

  3. Would a service only contain functionality directly related to filtering and processing information from the database / repository or could one consider for example a class dedicated purely to encryption and generating random strings / passwords or a class handling provider relying party functionality a service as well? Or they / one would be considered utility classes perhaps?

  4. Is there a good and accepted way to manipulate sessions inside a service or this should be passed to the controller and handled there?

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Hi, welcome to stackoverflow. I realize MVC is a tricky subject, but your question is far to broad. If you read the faq ( stackoverflow.com/faq#dontask ) If you can imagine an entire book that answers your question, you’re asking too much. There are plenty of books on mvc. My advise is to just try and make an mvc framework and then ask specific questions as they pop up. There is no answer anyone can give you which will help MVC just make sense. That understanding is forged from experience. – Dave Jul 28 '12 at 0:47
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Are you talking about ASP.NET MVC or the MVC pattern in general? Your tags make it confusing, because they are not the same thing. – tereško Jul 28 '12 at 1:20
    
Hi and thanks for the welcome ;) I was talking about asp.net MVC and the reason i was talking in very wide terms was that i was looking more for generic guidelines(if possible) then an exact answer to one specific problem. Luxspes seems to respond on the level of answer i was searching for so im happy with that answer if now one has any useful additions to it. On a sidenote i saw people recommending the book 'Clean code' so i was thinking of checking that out to see if it helps me dive further into the subject. – DanielR Jul 28 '12 at 8:28
up vote 1 down vote accepted

A service should not be dependent on the presentation layer, so passing stuff like httpcontext into service / service functions through contstructor and similar is a bad practise, correct

If you can avoid it, avoid it. But it depends, if its a service for the presentation layer, then it can be OK.

Should one not have services referencing each other? Should they only work 'downward' like for example repository dependancy? Or that is considered ok?

If you can avoid it, avoid it. It dependes on you architecture, if, for example, your are working in asp.net mvc, you would do well in avoiding this, and keeping the kind of code that orchestrates your multiple service at the Controller level

Would a service only contain functionality directly related to filtering and processing information from the database / repository or could one consider for example a class dedicated purely to encryption and generating random strings / passwords or a class handling provider relying party functionality a service as well? Or they / one would be considered utility classes perhaps?

You can use services for filtering and processing information from the database / repository or you can also create one dedicated purely to encryption and generating random strings / passwords. Services are classes, so it is important that they follow the Single Responsability Principle

Is there a good and accepted way to manipulate sessions inside a service or this should be passed to the controller and handled there?

It is better for scaling if your services are stateless, but if you are going to have to deal with sessions or other lifecycle stuff, and you are building web systems in .net, the best you could do is to use asp.net mvc, integrated with Unity so that you get Inversion Of Control, that way you can deal with session using life time managers

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