Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#include <stdbool.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#include "dictionary.h"

#define HASH_SIZE 100

// prototype
int hash(char *word);

// counter
int counter;

// node
typedef struct
{
    char *word;
    node *next;
} node;

// hash table
node *hashtable[HASH_SIZE];

bool
load(const char *dictionary)
{
    // open the dictionary
    FILE *dict = fopen(dictionary, "r");
    if(dict == NULL)
    {
        printf("Could not open %s.\n", dictionary);
        return false;
    }

    // set all values in the hash table to null
    for(int i = 0; i < HASH_SIZE; i++)
    {
        hashtable[i] = NULL;
    }

    // set the counter to 0
    counter = 0;

    // iterate through the words in the dictionary
    while (!feof(dict))
    {
        // get word into a string
        char gotcha[LENGTH];
        fscanf(dict, "%s", gotcha);

        // declare a node and allocate memory
        node n;
        n.word = malloc( strlen(gotcha)*sizeof(char) );

        // save the word into the node
        strcpy(n.word, gotcha);

        // hash the word, baby!
        int hash_value = hash(n.word);

        // start saving addresses to the hashtable
        n.next = hashtable[hash_value];
        hashtable[hash_value] = &n;

        //test
        int len = strlen(n.word);
        printf("%s\n", n.word);
        printf("%i\n", len);

        // that's one more!
        counter++;
    }


    fclose(dict);

    return true;
}

I am receiving the following two errors on these two lines of code:

    n.next = hashtable[hash_value];
    hashtable[hash_value] = &n;

dictionary.c:89:16: error: assignment from incompatible pointer type [-Werror] dictionary.c:90:31: error: assignment from incompatible pointer type [-Werror] How do I save pointer values in these two places? I am new to this, so please bear that in mind. :)

share|improve this question
1  
you are missing half the code needed to figure out what is going on. –  MK. Jul 28 '12 at 3:49
    
how is the hashtable defined? –  perreal Jul 28 '12 at 4:01
    
Okay, I added code to answer these two comments. –  hannah Jul 28 '12 at 4:15
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your structure, the type node is not yet defined. Change it to use the structure tag:

typedef struct node
{
    char *word;
    struct node *next;
} node;
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the help! –  hannah Jul 28 '12 at 4:24
    
Or, better, declare the struct before defining it: typedef struct node node; struct node { char* word; node* next; }; –  Jim Balter Jul 28 '12 at 4:53
add comment

This:

typedef struct
{
    char *word;
    node *next;
} node;

is a syntax error. The node *next; occurs before the end of the typedef that creates node as a type. If your compiler for some reason accepted this, it probably thinks there are 2 different types called "node" now, which explains why one of them isn't compaible with the other. You should give up on that typedef silliness (structs generally shouldn't be typedef'ed) and just use

struct node
{
    char *word;
    struct node *next;
};
share|improve this answer
    
There is no basis for the assertion that structs shouldn't be typedefed, and there are millions of lines of C code using typedefed structs. –  Jim Balter Jul 28 '12 at 5:00
1  
Linux kernel CodingStyle chapter 5 is a well-thought out argument on the topic. It basically says "don't typedef" –  Alan Curry Jul 28 '12 at 5:16
    
I wouldn't call that well thought out at all. "vps_t a; in the source, what does it mean? In contrast, if it says struct virtual_container *a; you can actually tell what "a" is." is a ridiculous and dishonest comparison of apples and oranges. struct vps a is no clearer that vps_t a. virtual_container *a is no less clear than struct virtual_container *a. Competent professionals don't abide by dishonest arguments. –  Jim Balter Jul 28 '12 at 5:57
    
Then just take this question with the messed-up node definition as evidence. It wouldn't have happened if someone wasn't trying to be too clever with typedef. I've seen many other instances of the same clever brokenness , motivated by a desire to strip away as many instances of the struct keyword as possible, an unreasonable obsession for anyone but especially unreasonable for a beginner. I say let them learn how structs work in the absence of typedefs first. It's less complex. –  Alan Curry Jul 28 '12 at 6:42
    
No, it's not evidence. Competent professional programmers typedef structs; in C++, that's how they all are. I said there is no basis for the assertion and none has been given, not by Linus and not by you ... it's just an ideological stance. My last word. –  Jim Balter Jul 28 '12 at 6:46
add comment

Define typedef names of structs before defining the structs. This allows mutually referring structs without concern for order and doesn't require inconsistent definitions, sometimes with the struct keyword and sometimes without it. Note that in C++ you can do away with the typedef line entirely:

typedef struct node node;

struct node
{
    char* word;
    node* next;
};
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.