Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to calculate all the primes up to an arbitrary number by computing them in parallel. I'm aware that isPrime() can be improved from what it is now, but the main problem is that I can't synchronize access to the ArrayList that is storing the results. I've instantiated a dummy object "m" to serve as a monitor and control access to the array. Obviously I've made a mistake in reasoning somewhere because I get a java.util.ConcurrentModificationException every time. NB: gist

EDIT: updated to show completion after suggestions.

import java.util.ArrayList;
public class Main {
    static final int MAX = 100000000;
    static final int THREADS = Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors();
    static final int ARRINITSIZE = 100000;
    static ArrayList<Integer> primes = new ArrayList<Integer>(ARRINITSIZE);

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Thread[] t = new Thread[THREADS];
        PrimeRun.m = new Monitor();

        for (int i=0; i<THREADS; i++) {
            t[i] = new Thread(new PrimeRun(i) );
            t[i].start();
        }

        // wait for threads to finish
        for (int i=0; i<THREADS; i++)
            t[i].join();

        // NOTE: primes will be out of order because of random thread scheduling 
        for (int n : primes)
            System.out.print("" + n + " ");
        System.out.println();
    }

    static boolean isPrime(int n) {
        if (n == 2 || n == 3 || n == 5) return true;
        if (n <= 1 || (n&1) == 0) return false;

        for (int i = 3; i*i <= n; i += 2)
            if (n % i == 0) return false;

        return true;
    }

    synchronized static void addPrime(int n) {
        primes.add(n);
    }

}

class PrimeRun implements Runnable {
    public static Monitor m;
    final int ID;
    public PrimeRun(int i) {
        ID = i;
    }

    public void run() {
    for(int i=0; i < Main.MAX; i++) {
        if(i % Main.THREADS == ID)
            if(Main.isPrime(i)) 
                m.addPrime(i);
        }
    }
}

class Monitor {
    public synchronized void addPrime(int n) {
        Main.addPrime(n);
    }
}

I've included my ant script for convenience :)

<project default="cmp">
  <target name="cmp"><javac srcdir="." debug="true"/></target>
  <target name="run" depends="cmp"><java classname="Main" classpath="."/></target>
  <target name="cln"><delete><fileset dir="." includes="*.class"/></delete></target>
</project>
share|improve this question
    
To comment on your isPrime() method rather than dividing by i+=2, try dividing by primes.get(i++). This keeps you from dividing by 15 after you've already passed 3 and 5. – gobernador Jul 28 '12 at 6:13
    
@gobernador do you mean, read the array for primes that have already been computed and modulo by that number? or do you mean increment the loop counter by a different value? – xst Jul 28 '12 at 6:18
    
Modulo by the primes less than the number you're testing. It will lead to fewer calculations and give you some drastic speed improvements at higher numbers where there are fewer primes. – gobernador Jul 28 '12 at 18:46
    
@gobernador as it is now, primes[] is not sorted so this won't work unless i block some threads until the nth one completes for every single number so they are inserted in order right? – xst Jul 29 '12 at 7:42
    
The order doesn't really matter, I think. It should work out fine whether primes[] is sorted or unsorted. – gobernador Jul 29 '12 at 17:46
up vote 4 down vote accepted

How about declaring primes as

static List<Integer> primes = Collections.synchronizedList(new ArrayList<Integer>(ARRINITSIZE));

And you should be able to get rid of the Monitor and the synchronized blocks... Oh and you will have to wait till the threads that calculates primes to finish before starting to print values from primes list

Edit

Here is the modified program where it just waits for the threads to finish

    import java.util.ArrayList;
    import java.util.List;

    public class Main {
        static final int MAX = 1000;
        static final int THREADS = Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors();
        static final int ARRINITSIZE = 100000;
        static ArrayList<Integer> primes = new ArrayList<Integer>(ARRINITSIZE);

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        PrimeRun.m = new Monitor();

        List<Thread> thread = new ArrayList<Thread>();
        for (int i=0; i<THREADS; i++){
            Thread t = new Thread(new PrimeRun(i));
            t.start();
           thread.add(t);
        }

        for (Thread t : thread) {
            if (t.isAlive()){
                try {
                    t.join();
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {

                }
            }

        }

        for (int n : primes)
            System.out.print("" + n + " ");
    }

    static boolean isPrime(int n) {
        if (n <= 1 || (n&1) == 0) return false;
        if (n == 2 || n == 3 || n == 5) return true;

        for (int i = 3; n*n <= i; i += 2)
            if (n % i == 0) return false;

        return true;
    }

    synchronized static void addPrime(int n) {
        primes.add(n);
    }

}

    class PrimeRun implements Runnable {
        public static Monitor m;
        final int ID;
        public PrimeRun(int i) {
            ID = i;
        }

        public void run() {
        for(int i=0; i < Main.MAX; i++) {
            if(i % Main.THREADS == ID)
                if(Main.isPrime(i)) 
                    m.addPrime(i);
            }
        }
    }

    class Monitor {
        public synchronized void addPrime(int n) {
            Main.addPrime(n);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I want to learn the gory details of concurrent programming. Otherwise, I would have gone with this. – xst Jul 28 '12 at 6:03
    
so in Main, references should be kept to the spawned threads and then join() on each of them right? – xst Jul 28 '12 at 6:05
    
See the edited answer for code to just wait for the threads to finish – maneesh Jul 28 '12 at 6:12

You get ConcurrentModificationException because you are iterating over array while adding to it. It has nothing to do with multiple threads and will happen even in a single thread. But in your specific case it happens because threads are still adding primes when you start iterating over the list. To prevent that you must wait for all threads to finish before printing. To do it you can iterate array of threads and call join() on each one of them. Or you can use CountdownLatch.

List can be made synchronized via Collections.synchronizedList() as suggested in the other answer.

share|improve this answer
    
If your going to try adding to a list while iterating it, convert it to an array first and iterate the array – MadProgrammer Jul 28 '12 at 6:07

Reason fro ConcurrentModificationException is not bad synchronization. The reason is that you are modifying list during iteration on it.

The only iteration I found in your code is

for (int n : primes)
      System.out.print("" + n + " ");

Here is what happens. You are running several threads that do their job and add elements to collection. The code that runs threads is immediately following by code that iterates over list and prints its elements. So the iteration and your working threads are running simultaneously.

To fix this you should wait until all your working threads have finished and then print. Indeed you want to print the results only when all calculations have been finished. Check out method Thread.join() to implement this.

And obviously do what @maneesh recommended you, i.e. use Collections.synchronizedList() instead of your manual synchronization.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.