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I want to find all the exact divisors of a number. Currently I have this:

{
   int n;
   int i=2;
   scanf("%d",&n);
   while(i<=n/2)
    {
        if(n%i==0)
                  printf("%d,",i);
        i++;
     }
   getch();
}

Is there any way to improve it?

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I believe that should be while(i<=n/2), because otherwise it would be missing the largest divisor of even numbers. (Try it with e.g. n=10 - you won't see the output 5.) –  Wormbo Jul 28 '12 at 8:04
    
Actually it should be sqrt(n) + 1, not? –  user529758 Jul 28 '12 at 8:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 19 down vote accepted

First, your code should have the condition as i <= n/2 , otherwise it can miss one of the factors , for example 6 will not be printed in case of n=12.

Run the loop till sqaure root of the number ie: sqrt(n) and print both i and n/i (both will be multiples of n).

{
   int n;
   int i=2;
   scanf("%d",&n);
   while(i < sqrt(n))
    {
        if(n%i==0) {
            printf("%d,",i);
            printf("%d,",n/i);
        }

        i++;
    }
   if(i*i == n)
        printf("%d,",i); 
   getch();
}

Note :

  • For a perfect sqaure , so that the square root is not printed twice , the additional checking is done at the end of loop for i*i == n as suggested by @chepner.
  • If you want all the factors in ascending order , store them in an array, at the end of the loop , sort all the numbers and display.
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1  
you can change printf("%d,", i);printf("%d,", n/i); to printf("%d,", i); if(i != n/i){printf("%d,", n/i);}.For a perfect square, it will not print twice of the root. –  MYMNeo Jul 28 '12 at 8:22
    
Added it into the code. –  Rndm Jul 28 '12 at 8:23
2  
You can avoid the multiple checks for n/i !=i by iterating over i < sqrt(n), which implies that n/i != i, then checking i=sqrt(n) outside the while loop as a single edge case. –  chepner Jul 28 '12 at 16:22
    
Great thought , my bad not to realise it. Will add it, thanks. –  Rndm Jul 28 '12 at 16:23

The simple linear search can be improved by first throwing out all factors of 2. That can be done by simple bit shifting, or count training zero's with a nice intrinsic function. That's very fast in either case. Then run the algorithm suggested by shg (which will run much faster now that the powers of two aren't present), and combine the result with all the possible powers of two (don't forget this step). It helps a lot for inputs that have a lot of training zero's, but it even helps if they don't - you wouldn't have to test any even divisors anymore, so the loop becomes half as long.

Throwing out some constant low factors (but bigger than 2) can also help. Modulo with a constant is almost certainly optimized by the compiler (or if not, you can do it yourself), but more importantly, that means there are fewer divisors left to test. Don't forget to combine that factor with the divisors you find.

You can also factorize the number completely (use your favourite algorithm - probably Pollard's Rho would be best), and then print all products (except the empty product and the full product) of the factors. This has a good chance of ending up being faster for bigger inputs - Pollard's Rho algorithm finds factors very quickly compared to a simple linear search, there are usually less factors than proper divisors, and the last step (enumerating the products) only involves fast math (no divisions). This mostly helps for numbers with very small factors, which Rho finds the quickest.

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could u give an example of how to remove all the factors of 2 by bit shifting.Bit operations are faster so that would surely improve the performance. –  jairaj Jul 28 '12 at 8:44
    
@jairaj say you take 24, the square root is almost 5 but not quite, so you'd have to test the divisors 2, 3 and 4 (they would generate 12, 8 and 6, respectively). If you take out all powers of two, you're left with 3. Just 3. The square root of 3 is less than 2 so you don't need to test any divisors. So you went from 3 slow divisions to zero divisions + a couple of shifts (first to remove the powers of two, then later to add them back in). A clear win. –  harold Jul 28 '12 at 8:54
    
@jairaj as for the combining: you'd have 3 powers of 2: 2, 4 and 8. These are all divisors. Now multiply each of them by 3 ("all" the other divisors, of which there happens to be only one), to get 6, 12 and 24. Then throw out 24 because it's not a proper divisor. –  harold Jul 28 '12 at 9:05

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