Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new to wxPython, so please be gentle.

I'm attempting to make virtual list control that is controlled via a context menu popup when the user presses the right mouse button.

From my little bit of experience, it seems that the virtual list control likes to operate with "item" (read: 'row') and "column" numbers. Fair enough.

When I receive a right-click event, I can get the row (item) number easy enough by calling event.GetIndex(). But how do I get the column number of the object that was clicked?

import wx
import wx.lib.agw.ultimatelistctrl as ULC

class MyFrame(wx.Frame):
    def __init__(self):
        wx.Frame.__init__(self, None, wx.ID_ANY, "Right-click example")
        self.list = MyListCtrl(parent=self)
        sizer = wx.BoxSizer(wx.VERTICAL)
        sizer.Add(self.list, 1, wx.EXPAND)
        self.SetSizer(sizer)

class MyListCtrl(ULC.UltimateListCtrl):
     def __init__(self, parent, *args, **kwargs):
         ULC.UltimateListCtrl.__init__(self, parent, 1, agwStyle=wx.LC_REPORT|wx.LC_VIRTUAL|wx.LC_HRULES|wx.LC_VRULES)

        self.InsertColumn(0, "Column0")
        self.InsertColumn(1, "Column1")
        self.SetItemCount(5)
        # Bindings
        self.Bind(ULC.EVT_LIST_ITEM_RIGHT_CLICK, self.OnRightClick)

    def OnGetItemText(self, item, column):
        return "%d, %d" % (item, column)

    def OnGetItemToolTip(self, item, column):
        pass

    def OnGetItemTextColour(self, item, column):
        pass

    def OnRightClick(self, event):
        # Get the index (i.e. which row was clicked)
        print("OnColRightClick: GetIndex = %r\n" %(event.GetIndex()))
        # How can I get which column was clicked?

if __name__ == "__main__":
    # Start the GUI
    app = wx.App()
    frame = MyFrame()
    app.SetTopWindow(frame)
    frame.Show()
    app.MainLoop()
share|improve this question
    
Interestingly, there is a GetColumn() method but the documentation states it is only for special events (like column dragging) and it is consistently returning 0 for me no matter which column I right-click –  acattle Jul 28 '12 at 8:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Sadly there is not a good way to get the column information. I did find this discussion on the matter though: http://wxpython-users.1045709.n5.nabble.com/Getting-row-col-of-selected-cell-in-ListCtrl-td2360831.html

It sounds like you'd have to calculate it yourself. According to Robin, there's some code in wx.lib.mixins.listctrl.TextEditMixin that might help. I also found the recipe for ObjectListView (a wrapper for ListCtrl) that also might help: http://code.activestate.com/recipes/577543-objectlistview-getcolumnclickedevent-handler/

share|improve this answer

"If at first you don't succeed, try again. Then quit; there's no use being a damn fool about it." -- Mark Twain

I'm embarrassed to admit that I wasted a week on this. To avoid others falling into this same trap, let me simplify things:

If you have a list of things, where each thing has sub-elements that you want to display together but are happy to operate on as a group, then a ListCtrl may work for you.

If you have a list of things, where each thing has sub-elements, but you're interested in operating on those sub-elements independently, ListCtrl appears to not be what you want.

I've started using the Grid widget, and so far it seems to be working for my purposes. This may come back to bite me later, but for now it seems to work. Here's some slightly modified code from the Wx Huge Grid demo to illustrate how a click on the grid widget will return both row and column "addresses".

If anyone has suggestions for how to get the column numbers from ListCtrl, I'm certainly all ears.

import  wx
import  wx.grid as  gridlib

#---------------------------------------------------------------------------
class HugeTable(gridlib.PyGridTableBase):
    def __init__(self, log):
        gridlib.PyGridTableBase.__init__(self)
        self.log = log

        self.odd=gridlib.GridCellAttr()
        self.odd.SetBackgroundColour("sky blue")
        self.even=gridlib.GridCellAttr()
        self.even.SetBackgroundColour("sea green")

    def GetAttr(self, row, col, kind):
        attr = [self.even, self.odd][row % 2]
        attr.IncRef()
        return attr

    # This is all it takes to make a custom data table to plug into a
    # wxGrid.  There are many more methods that can be overridden, but
    # the ones shown below are the required ones.  This table simply
    # provides strings containing the row and column values.

    def GetNumberRows(self):
        return 10000

    def GetNumberCols(self):
        return 10000

    def IsEmptyCell(self, row, col):
        return False

    def GetValue(self, row, col):
        return str( (row, col) )

    def SetValue(self, row, col, value):
        self.log.write('SetValue(%d, %d, "%s") ignored.\n' % (row, col, value))

#---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 class HugeTableGrid(gridlib.Grid):
    def __init__(self, parent, log):
        gridlib.Grid.__init__(self, parent, -1)

        table = HugeTable(log)

        # The second parameter means that the grid is to take ownership of the
        # table and will destroy it when done.  Otherwise you would need to keep
        # a reference to it and call it's Destroy method later.
        self.SetTable(table, True)

        self.Bind(gridlib.EVT_GRID_CELL_RIGHT_CLICK, self.OnCellRightClick)

    def OnCellRightClick(self, event):
        print "OnCellRightClick: (%d,%d)\n" % (event.GetRow(), event.GetCol())

#---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 class TestFrame(wx.Frame):
    def __init__(self, parent, log):
        wx.Frame.__init__(self, parent, -1, "Huge (virtual) Table Demo", size=(640,480))
        grid = HugeTableGrid(self, log)

        grid.SetReadOnly(5,5, True)

#---------------------------------------------------------------------------
if __name__ == '__main__':
    import sys
    app = wx.App()
    frame = TestFrame(None, sys.stdout)
    frame.Show(True)
    app.MainLoop()
share|improve this answer
    
Since ListCtrl didn't want to give me column references, I moved to the "virtual" grid (continuing the use of the "virtual" nomenclature used in ListCtrl; i.e. the data is only displayed, not held by the wx objects. Grid objects call this "external tables"). Grid readily gives me column references, but other things that I took for granted in ListCtrl (such as auto-sizing the row labels) requires similar custom code. Custom code to get column numbers or custom code to get auto-sizing of lables.... pick your poison. –  JS. Aug 1 '12 at 20:26

I don't know if you can get the column number in a listctrl when clicking a row (because it selects the entire row, not a single cell) ... however, if you want the number of the column when clicking on the column (like I did and after a lot of searches ended up here) you can bind an event (wx.EVT_LIST_COL_CLICK/wx.EVT_LIST_COL_RIGHT_CLICK) to your listctrl and in the event method use event.m_col ... it stores the column number there

    self.Bind(wx.EVT_LIST_COL_CLICK, self.onColumnClick, self.myListCtrl)
...
def onColumnClick(self, evt):
    column_clicked = evt.m_col

Got my inspiration from here: http://wxpython.org/Phoenix/docs/html/ListCtrl.html , at the 'Events Emitted by this Class' section

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tip! I'll give that a try on my next project. –  JS. Aug 8 '13 at 16:14

This works for a grid, might be easily adapted to a ListCtrl:

def onclick(self,event):
    rows = cumsum(self.GetRowSize(i) for i in range(self.GetNumberRows()))
    cols = cumsum(self.GetColSize(i) for i in range(self.GetNumberCols()))
    irow = self.GetNumberRows() - sum(event.m_y < y for y in rows)
    icol = self.GetNumberCols() - sum(event.m_x < x for x in cols)
    print irow,icol
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.