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I am trying to find certain coordinates of interest within a very large virtual grid. This grid does not actually exist in memory since the dimensions are huge. For the sake of this question, let's assume those dimensions to be (Width x Height) = (Int32.MaxValue x Int32.MaxValue).

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10
  2   4   6   8  10  12  14  16  18  20
  3   6   9  12  15  18  21  24  27  30
  4   8  12  16  20  24  28  32  36  40
  5  10  15  20  25  30  35  40  45  50
  6  12  18  24  30  36  42  48  54  60
  7  14  21  28  35  42  49  56  63  70
  8  16  24  32  40  48  56  64  72  80
  9  18  27  36  45  54  63  72  81  90
 10  20  30  40  50  60  70  80  90 100

Known data about grid:

  • Dimensions of the grid = (Int32.MaxValue x Int32.MaxValue).
  • Value at any given (x, y) coordinate = Product of X and Y = (x * y).

Given the above large set of finite numbers, I need to calculate a set of coordinates whose value (x * y) is a power of e. Let's say e is 2 in this case.

Since looping through the grid is not an option, I thought about looping through:

int n = 0;
long r = 0;
List<long> powers = new List<long>();
while (r < (Int32.MaxValue * Int32.MaxValue))
{
    r = Math.Pow(e, n++);
    powers.Add(r);
}

This gives us a unique set of powers. I now need to find out at what coordinates each power exists. Let's take 2^3=8. As shown in the grid above, 8 exists in 4 coordinates: (8,1), (4,2), (2,4) & (1, 8).

Clearly the problem here is finding multiple factors of the number 8 but this would become impractical for larger numbers. Is there another way to achieve this and am I missing something?

  • Using sets won't work since the factors don't exist in memory.
  • Is there a creative way to factor knowing that the number in question will always be a power of e?
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Another solution, not as sophisticated as the idea from Commodore63, but therefore maybe a little bit simpler (no need to do a prime factorization and calculating all proper subsets):

const int MaxX = 50;
const int MaxY = 50;
const int b = 6;

var maxExponent = (int)Math.Log((long)MaxX * MaxY, b);

var result = new List<Tuple<int, int>>[maxExponent + 1];
for (var i = 0; i < result.Length; ++i)
  result[i] = new List<Tuple<int, int>>();

// Add the trivial case
result[0].Add(Tuple.Create(1, 1));

// Add all (x,y) with x*y = b
for (var factor = 1; factor <= (int)Math.Sqrt(b); ++factor)
  if (b % factor == 0)
    result[1].Add(Tuple.Create(factor, b / factor));

// Now handle the rest, meaning x > b, y <= x, x != 1, y != 1
for (var x = b; x <= MaxX; ++x) {
  if (x % b != 0)
    continue;

  // Get the max exponent for b in x and the remaining factor
  int exp = 1;
  int lastFactor = x / b;
  while (lastFactor >= b && lastFactor % b == 0) {
    ++exp;
    lastFactor = lastFactor / b;
  }

  if (lastFactor > 1) {
    // Find 1 < y < b with x*y yielding a power of b
    for (var y = 2; y < b; ++y)
      if (lastFactor * y == b)
        result[exp + 1].Add(Tuple.Create(x, y));
  } else {
    // lastFactor == 1 meaning that x is a power of b
    // that means that y has to be a power of b (with y <= x)
    for (var k = 1; k <= exp; ++k)
      result[exp + k].Add(Tuple.Create(x, (int)Math.Pow(b, k)));
  }
}

// Output the result
for (var i = 0; i < result.Length; ++i) {
  Console.WriteLine("Exponent {0} - Power {1}:", i, Math.Pow(b, i));
  foreach (var pair in result[i]) {
    Console.WriteLine("  {0}", pair);
    //if (pair.Item1 != pair.Item2)
    //  Console.WriteLine("  ({0}, {1})", pair.Item2, pair.Item1);
  }
}
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Thank you. Could you please comment on what the complexity would be for this approach and do you think it would work on numbers with millions of digits in them? –  Raheel Khan Jul 29 '12 at 20:41
    
If you use big numbers, the above code has at least to be changed so that it does not store all results. In case of runtime complexity: the main loop contains a loop calculating all factors of the current main loop variable x. That's not cheap. If you have numbers with million of digits in it, I think you will have to really carefully design a very customized algorithm. –  Stefan Nobis Jul 30 '12 at 15:03
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The best method is to factor e into it prime components. Lets say they are as follows: {a^m, b^p, c^q}. Then you build set for each power of e, for example if m=2, p=1, q=3,

e^1 = {a, a, b, c, c, c}

e^2 = (a, a, a, a, b, b, c, c, c, c, c, c}

etc. up to e^K > Int32.MaxValue * Int32.MaxValue

then for each set you need to iterate over each unique subset of these sets to form one coordinate. The other coordinate is what remains. You will need one nested loop for each of the unique primes in e. For example:

Lets say for e^2

  M=m*m;
  P=p*p;
  Q=q*q;

  c1 = 1 ;
  for (i=0 ; i<=M ; i++)
  {
    t1 = c1 ;
    for (j=0 ; j<=P ; j++)
    {
      t2 = c1 ;
      for (k=0 ; k<=Q ; k++)
      {
        // c1 holds first coordinate
        c2 = e*e/c1 ;
        // store c1, c2

        c1 *= c ;
      }
      c1 = t2*b ;
    }
    c1 = t1*a ;
  }

There should be (M+1)(P+1)(Q+1) unique coordinates.

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Thanks. What is the method above called and where could I look it up to understand what you're doing and what its complexity is? –  Raheel Khan Jul 29 '12 at 20:40
    
@Raheel, I am not aware that this method has a name any more than the problem has a name. Basically, what you are trying to find is unique factorizations of e, e^2, etc. Since you presumably already know the prime factorization of e, the rest is cake. If e is large, you will probably want to look up algorithms on the factorization of large numbers. –  Commodore63 Jul 31 '12 at 0:16
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