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On my page I am changing some css styles via javascript. When I try and pull a value that has been inherited - it comes up blank. Consider the following:

    .Sliding
    {
        display: none;
        overflow: hidden;
    }

    .Sliding #FilterBox
    {
        height: 185px;
        background-color: Fuchsia;
    }

And the html:

<div class="Sliding" id="FilterBox">
        <h3>Test Form</h3>
        This is a test/<br />
        12345
</div>

If I look at the element 'document.getElementById(objname).style.display' its blank? How can I read the display value via via javascript?

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Thanks everyone. Using getComputedStyle helped resolve my issue. I'm taking it that getElementById().style is just used for individual style settings - not those set by a class or id. –  cschear Jul 24 '09 at 7:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You'll want to use getComputedStyle.

The .style property is a means of accessing and setting inline style (i.e. like the style attribute).

Note, however, that your example has nothing to do with inheritance. Just rule-sets that apply directly to the elements you are interested in. Inheritance is when an element takes on the same style as its parent via the inherit keyword.

span {
    color: inherit;
}

getComputedStyle will give the final computed value though, so it will pick up inherited values too.

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2  
getComputedStyle() does not work in all popular browsers (without naming any) –  Philippe Leybaert Jul 23 '09 at 6:43

Your second CSS rule:

.Sliding #FilterBox
{
    height: 185px;
    background-color: Fuchsia;
}

will match anything with id "FilterBox" that is a descendant of anything with a class "Sliding", so this rule does not apply to your div.

And to get the computed style, you can refer to Fabien's answer, or consider using jQuery, which makes this stuff a lot easier:

using jQuery, $("#FilterBox").css("display") would return the current value for "display".

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-1 A fair comment - but this isn't an answer. –  Quentin Jul 23 '09 at 6:37
    
Sure, but you can point him a million times toward computed style, but if the CSS is incorrect, it's a waste of time –  Philippe Leybaert Jul 23 '09 at 6:39
    
Since the second rule doesn't touch the display property, it wouldn't have any impact if it was written to apply to that element. –  Quentin Jul 23 '09 at 6:44
    
Thanks Philippe. –  cschear Jul 24 '09 at 7:16

You need to look at the computed style, see here

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if (!window.getComputedStyle) 
{
    window.getComputedStyle = function(el, pseudo) 
    {
        this.el = el;
        this.getPropertyValue = function(prop) {

        var re = /(\-([a-z]){1})/g;
        if (prop == 'float') 
            prop = 'styleFloat';
        if (re.test(prop)) 
        {
            prop = prop.replace(re, function () {

            return arguments[2].toUpperCase();
           });
        }

        return el.currentStyle[prop] ? el.currentStyle[prop] : null;
      }

      return this;
   }
}

function GetCompStyle()
{   
    var compStyle = window.getComputedStyle(document.getElementById('FilterBox'), "");
    alert(compStyle.getPropertyValue("display"));   
}
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