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May be simple question but i am confused

which code is optimized ? and should i use ?

what is the difference in internal process ?

String str = editText.getText().toString();     
str =str.trim().toLowerCase();
textView.setText(str);

textView.setText(editText.getText().toString().trim().toLowerCase());
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6  
This is the kind of hyper-micro optimizations that don't matter. Use the code that you find the more readable. (I'm not the downvoter, though) –  JB Nizet Jul 28 '12 at 9:22
    
Thanks @JBNizet –  MAC Jul 28 '12 at 9:24
2  
I (pronoun) –  Sa Dec Jul 28 '12 at 16:56
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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Don't think that if you put everything on a single line, it will be better than if you split the statement in multiple lines. Generally the Java compiler is smart enough to produce exactly the same bytecode in both cases. Modern compilers do a lot of micro-optimizations.

You can check if there's a difference by compiling them, then decompile the bytecode with the command javap -c.

Edit :

I just tested and here are the results :

String str = editText.getText().toString();     
str = str.trim().toLowerCase();
textView.setText(str);

compiles to :

       0: aload_0       
       1: getfield      #7                  // Field textView:Landroid/widget/TextView;
       4: aload_0       
       5: getfield      #4                  // Field editText:Landroid/widget/EditText;
       8: invokevirtual #8                  // Method android/widget/EditText.getText:()Landroid/text/Editable;
      11: invokevirtual #9                  // Method java/lang/Object.toString:()Ljava/lang/String;
      14: invokevirtual #10                 // Method java/lang/String.trim:()Ljava/lang/String;
      17: invokevirtual #11                 // Method java/lang/String.toLowerCase:()Ljava/lang/String;
      20: invokevirtual #12                 // Method android/widget/TextView.setText:(Ljava/lang/CharSequence;)V
      23: return        

and the second one :

textView.setText(editText.getText().toString().trim().toLowerCase());

gives the following result :

       0: aload_0       
       1: getfield      #7                  // Field textView:Landroid/widget/TextView;
       4: aload_0       
       5: getfield      #4                  // Field editText:Landroid/widget/EditText;
       8: invokevirtual #8                  // Method android/widget/EditText.getText:()Landroid/text/Editable;
      11: invokevirtual #9                  // Method java/lang/Object.toString:()Ljava/lang/String;
      14: invokevirtual #10                 // Method java/lang/String.trim:()Ljava/lang/String;
      17: invokevirtual #11                 // Method java/lang/String.toLowerCase:()Ljava/lang/String;
      20: invokevirtual #12                 // Method android/widget/TextView.setText:(Ljava/lang/CharSequence;)V
      23: return        

As you can see I guessed right, they are identical. The java compiler optimized the first example and completely removed the variable as it was useless.

So the conclusion is that you should use the code that you find the more readable.

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[1] creating String str occupies memory of the device, But it can be used later also; So if you need it later then it is optimized.

[2] that doesn't use memory, so simply optimized, But you need this string later then you have to fetch it all time, so it takes more machine-cycles to complete the process, in that case, 2nd one is lesser optimized.

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It only theoretically occupies thread stack space, not heap –  Sean Owen Jul 28 '12 at 10:31
    
@Swan Pardon, can you explain? I didn't get you! –  Chintan Raghwani Jul 28 '12 at 10:32
    
The difference is only an object reference. An object reference lives on the thread's stack, not on the heap. The thread already has a fixed stack allocated. I don't really think you can say it consumes more memory. –  Sean Owen Jul 28 '12 at 12:03
    
O.K. @Swan, got it, Thanks. –  Chintan Raghwani Jul 28 '12 at 12:06
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Here first you store your output in String variable so it occupy space for that then after you convert it into lowercase and set into textview.

And in second option you set into textview without storing it into any varible.

So second option is preferable if you do not want to use it in further coding.

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in first one you use additional variable it use more memory than second one. as far as second has a advantage of memory efficiency

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Both allocate exactly the same objects. –  Sean Owen Jul 28 '12 at 10:32
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Well, the second is less readable though it has advantage of more memory efficiency. Not assigning objects a reference variable makes them more eligible for Garbage Collection.

But needles to say, you should prefer readability over such small optimizations.

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@Downvoter...justify downvote please –  Ahmad Jul 28 '12 at 10:07
    
(I didn't downvote myself, but answering: the JVM can figure out when a local reference is not used later in the method and make the referent garbage collectable.) –  Sean Owen Jul 28 '12 at 10:30
    
well....as I think when local variable poped-out frm stack then only the object will be garbage collect-able. there are fair chances that you chain method calls and reference are there in place, thus making your object delayed for GC. –  Ahmad Jul 28 '12 at 10:40
    
The GC can know before the stack frame is discarded that an object reference is unused. nerds-central.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/… –  Sean Owen Jul 28 '12 at 12:06
    
I don't need to justify my downvote, but I can explain it: You are wrong. –  Matsemann Jul 30 '12 at 17:28
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In the first you are using an additional variable, it takes more memory than the second one.

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