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I am all confused after reading the article on javaranch site by Corey McGlone, The author of The SCJP Tip Line. named Strings, Literally and the SCJP Java 6 Programmer Guide by Kathy Sierra (co-founder of javaranch) and Bert Bates.

I will try to quote what Mr. Corey and Ms Kathy Sierra have quoted about String Literal Pool.

1. According to Mr Corey McGlone :

  • String Literal Pool is a Collection of references that points to the String Objects.

  • String s = "Hello"; (Assume there is No object on the Heap named "Hello"), will create an String object "Hello" on the heap, and will place an reference to this object in the String Literal Pool (Constant Table)

  • String a = new ("Bye"); (Assume there is No object on the Heap named "Bye", new operator will oblige the JVM to create an object on the Heap.

Now the explanation of "new" operator for the creation of a String and its reference is bit confusing in this article, so i am putting the code and explanation from the article itself as it-is below.

public class ImmutableStrings
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        String one = "someString";
        String two = new String("someString");

        System.out.println(one.equals(two));
        System.out.println(one == two);
    }
}

In this case, we actually end up with a slightly different behavior because of the keyword "new." In such a case, references to the two String literals are still put into the constant table (the String Literal Pool), but, when you come to the keyword "new," the JVM is obliged to create a new String object at run-time, rather than using the one from the constant table.

Here is the diagram explaining it..

enter image description here

So does it mean, that String Literal Pool too have a reference to this Object ?

Here is the link to the Article by Corey McGlone

http://www.javaranch.com/journal/200409/Journal200409.jsp#a1

2. According to Kathy Sierra and Bert Bates in SCJP book:

  • To make Java more memory efficient, the JVM set aside a special area of memory called the "String constant pool", when the compiler encounters a String Literal, it checks the pool to see if an identical String already exits or not. If not then it creates a new String Literal Object.

  • String s = "abc"; // Creates one String object and one reference variable....

    thats fine, but Now the below statement got me confused.

  • String s = new String("abc") // Creates two objects, and one reference variable.

    It says in the book that.... a new String object in normal(non-pool) memory , and "s" will refer to it... whereas an additional the literal "abc" will be placed in the pool.

    The above lines in the book collides with the one in the article by Corey McGlone.

    • If String Literal Pool is a collection of references to the String object as mentioned by Corey McGlone, then how come literal object "abc" will be placed in the pool, as mentioned in the book.

    • And where do this String Literal Pool resides.

Please clear this doubt, though it won't matter too much while writing a code, but is very important from the aspect of memory management, and thats the reason i want to clear this funda.

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1  
How the pool is managed might to some degree depend on the JVM implementation. As long as something isn't fixed by the language specification, they are free to experiment. So whether the pool holds references or objects might well depend, I believe. –  MvG Jul 28 '12 at 12:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 52 down vote accepted

I think the main point to understand here is the distinction between String Java object and its contents - char[] under private value field. String is basically a wrapper around char[] array, encapsulating it and making it impossible to modify so the String can remain immutable. Also the String class remembers which parts of this array is actually used (see below). This all means that you can have two different String objects (quite lightweight) pointing to the same char[].

I will show you few examples, together with hashCode() of each String and hashCode() of internal char[] value field (I will call it text to distinguish it from string). Finally I'll show javap -c -verbose output, together with constant pool for my test class. Please do not confuse class constant pool with string literal pool. They are not quite the same. See also Understanding javap's output for the Constant Pool.

Prerequisites

For the purpose of testing I created such a utility method that breaks String encapsulation:

private int showInternalCharArrayHashCode(String s) {
    final Field value = String.class.getDeclaredField("value");
    value.setAccessible(true);
    return value.get(s).hashCode();
}

It will print hashCode() of char[] value, effectively helping us understand whether this particular String points to the same char[] text or not.

Two string literals in a class

Let's start from the simplest example.

Java code

String one = "abc";
String two = "abc";

BTW if you simply write "ab" + "c", Java compiler will perform concatenation at compile time and the generated code will be exactly the same. This only works if all strings are known at compile time.

Class constant pool

Each class has its own constant pool - a list of constant values that can be reused if they occur several times in the source code. It includes common strings, numbers, method names, etc.

Here are the contents of the constant pool in our example above.

const #2 = String   #38;    //  abc
//...
const #38 = Asciz   abc;

The important thing to note is the distinction between String constant object (#2) and Unicode encoded text "abc" (#38) that the string points to.

Byte code

Here is generated byte code. Note that both one and two references are assigned with the same #2 constant pointing to "abc" string:

ldc #2; //String abc
astore_1    //one
ldc #2; //String abc
astore_2    //two

Output

For each example I am printing the following values:

System.out.println(showInternalCharArrayHashCode(one));
System.out.println(showInternalCharArrayHashCode(two));
System.out.println(System.identityHashCode(one));
System.out.println(System.identityHashCode(two));

No surprise that both pairs are equal:

23583040
23583040
8918249
8918249

Which means that not only both objects point to the same char[] (the same text underneath) so equals() test will pass. But even more, one and two are the exact same references! So one == two is true as well. Obviously if one and two point to the same object then one.value and two.value must be equal.

Literal and new String()

Java code

Now the example we all waited for - one string literal and one new String using the same literal. How will this work?

String one = "abc";
String two = new String("abc");

The fact that "abc" constant is used two times in the source code should give you some hint...

Class constant pool

Same as above.

Byte code

ldc #2; //String abc
astore_1    //one

new #3; //class java/lang/String
dup
ldc #2; //String abc
invokespecial   #4; //Method java/lang/String."<init>":(Ljava/lang/String;)V
astore_2    //two

Look carefully! The first object is created the same way as above, no surprise. It just takes a constant reference to already created String (#2) from the constant pool. However the second object is created via normal constructor call. But! The first String is passed as an argument. This can be decompiled to:

String two = new String(one);

Output

The output is a bit surprising. The second pair, representing references to String object is understandable - we created two String objects - one was created for us in the constant pool and the second one was created manually for two. But why, on earth the first pair suggests that both String objects point to the same char[] value array?!

41771
41771
8388097
16585653

It becomes clear when you look at how String(String) constructor works (greatly simplified here):

public String(String original) {
    this.offset = original.offset;
    this.count = original.count;
    this.value = original.value;
}

See? When you are creating new String object based on existing one, it reuses char[] value. Strings are immutable, there is no need to copy data structure that is known to be never modified.

I think this is the clue of your problem: even if you have two String objects, they might still point to the same contents. And as you can see the String object itself is quite small.

Runtime modification and intern()

Java code

Let's say you initially used two different strings but after some modifications they are all the same:

String one = "abc";
String two = "?abc".substring(1);  //also two = "abc"

The Java compiler (at least mine) is not clever enough to perform such operation at compile time, have a look:

Class constant pool

Suddenly we ended up with two constant strings pointing to two different constant texts:

const #2 = String   #44;    //  abc
const #3 = String   #45;    //  ?abc
const #44 = Asciz   abc;
const #45 = Asciz   ?abc;

Byte code

ldc #2; //String abc
astore_1    //one

ldc #3; //String ?abc
iconst_1
invokevirtual   #4; //Method String.substring:(I)Ljava/lang/String;
astore_2    //two

The fist string is constructed as usual. The second is created by first loading the constant "?abc" string and then calling substring(1) on it.

Output

No surprise here - we have two different strings, pointing to two different char[] texts in memory:

27379847
7615385
8388097
16585653

Well, the texts aren't really different, equals() method will still yield true. We have two unnecessary copies of the same text.

Now we should run two exercises. First, try running:

two = two.intern();

before printing hash codes. Not only both one and two point to the same text, but they are the same reference!

11108810
11108810
15184449
15184449

This means both one.equals(two) and one == two tests will pass. Also we saved some memory because "abc" text appears only once in memory (the second copy will be garbage collected).

The second exercise is slightly different, check out this:

String one = "abc";
String two = "abc".substring(1);

Obviously one and two are two different objects, pointing to two different texts. But how come the output suggests that they both point to the same char[] array?!?

23583040
23583040
11108810
8918249

I'll leave the answer to you. It'll teach you how substring() works, what are the advantages of such approach and when it can lead to big troubles.

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+1 , thanks for giving an in-depth working knowledge of String. But The above presented info is something i already had an idea about.. My question still stands... do the String Literal Pool is an Collection of Objects or Reference... And if String Literal Pool Holds object, so will using new operator will create two String objects, one outside and one inside the Memory Pool, and the reference points to the one outside Memory Pool. –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Jul 28 '12 at 15:26
    
@KumarVivekMitra: the exact details are probably implementation dependant. For sure string literals are placed in PermGen - but whether these are barely references to normal heap or char arrays themselves are also in PermGen - hard to say. Also check out references at the bottom of [Java Constant Pool : String ](jimlife.wordpress.com/2007/08/10/java-constant-pool-string) article. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Jul 28 '12 at 16:37
    
Great and in-depth answer Tomasz! Good to see some bytecode examples as it reveals some of the magic that happens under the hood. +1 mate! –  Piotr Nowicki Jul 28 '12 at 23:26
1  
+1 brilliant answer. But I think in the last example's output, you are getting similar hashCode for the String object not the vlaue char array. –  Eng.Fouad Jul 30 '12 at 8:02
    
@Eng.Fouad: +1, you are right, thanks! The output as it was had no sense –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Jul 30 '12 at 8:43
In Java, there is no operator overloading whatsoever, and that's why the comparison operators are only overloaded for the primitive types.

The 'String' class is not a primitive, thus it does not have an overloading for '==' and uses the default of comparing the address of the object in the computer's memory.

I'm not sure, but I think that in Java 7 or 8 oracle made an exception in the compiler to recognize str1 == str2 as str1.equals(str2)
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2  
I think you didn't read the question well, your answer is out of sync with the question –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Jun 17 '13 at 5:48

I went back and read the CodeRanch article, and I don't think that your summary of what it says is accurate. For instance, you've missed out the crucial point that the String object for "Hello" is allocated at class load time, not when the statement is executed. I suspect that your summary of the SCJP text is equally inaccurate ... and that your "doubts" are (in a large part) due to your inaccurate reading / summarizing.

Unfortunately, since we can only rely on your summary in the SCJP case, it is difficult to answer your question as to which text is correct.

I expect that the answer is that both are right, and that they are saying roughly the same thing in different ways.

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