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In a web page, there is a div with the following content--

<div id="test">
    <p> This is first sentence. This is second sentence. This is third sentence. This is 4th sentence. </p>
</div>

Now, how do I obtain the text "This is second sentence" from the above HTML fragment? I understand how to get to the div/p within which this text is present, but how to only extract that specific sentence?

Similarly, how do I extract the first 3 sentences? And also, how do I select the last 2 sentences? Finally, your Xquery expression should work for any type of delimiter- like "." / "," / ";" etc...

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Do your sentences never contain these characters? (For example, "e.g.", "i.e.", "U.S.") –  joewiz Jul 28 '12 at 17:50
    
@joewiz thank you for pointing this out... you are correct... now i will have to figure out some other way of extracting content...do let me know if you have any ideas :) –  Arvind Jul 28 '12 at 19:30
    
Added some thoughts on this to my answer. –  Jens Erat Jul 28 '12 at 22:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Now, how do I obtain the text "This is second sentence" from the above HTML fragment?

tokenize(/div/p, '\.')[2]

Similarly, how do I extract the first 3 sentences?

tokenize(/div/p, '\.')[position() le 3]

And also, how do I select the last 2 sentences?

tokenize(/div/p, '\.')[position() gt last() -2]

Finally, your Xquery expression should work for any type of delimiter- like "." / "," / ";" etc...

Use as the second argument of tokenize() a string like: '[.,;]'

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You've got a minor mistake, too - tokenize wants a regular expression, so '.' will split at every character thus will return lots of empty sequences. '\.' will do the job. Same in the last line, also see my answer. –  Jens Erat Jul 28 '12 at 22:35
    
Thans for noticing this -- fixed. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 28 '12 at 22:46
    
@DimitreNovatchev how do i obtain the 2nd and 3rd sentences only (ie not using first n or last n sentences)?? thanks... –  Arvind Aug 6 '12 at 0:11
    
@Arvind: Use: tokenize(/div/p, '\.,;')[position() eq 2 or position() eq 3] ` –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 6 '12 at 0:51

Splitting at points

Use fn:tokenize for deconstructing the string.

fn:tokenize(//p, "[\.,;]")[2]

The pattern may be any valid regular expression, it will be easy for you to fit it to your needs. Watch out for regex special characters.

For the first three sentences, use fn:position:

tokenize(//p, "[\.,;]")[position() le 3]

For more general analysis, you can use range expressions:

tokenize(//p, "[\.,;]")[position() = (2 to 3)]

Better sentence recognition

Not all points end sentences. For better sentence detection (though still not save in all cases), you could do some regex-foo:

tokenize(//p, '(?<=[\.,;])\s+(?=\p{Lu})')[2]

This will split at all whitespace characters (or multiple characters if they follow each other) which are preceded by a character from your list above and followed by a capital letter.

Caveats: Lookahead and -behind is not included in XQuery standard and thus supported by every implementation. It might be unsafe to use even if it is supported as this violates the standard and might be removed. I used BaseX 7.1.1 for this.

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Your second expression produces all tokens, not just the first three -- count(.) is always 1 –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 28 '12 at 21:36
    
Thank you, don't know how I got count into here, still had position in my editor... Shouldn't write answers on the hurry, fixed that. –  Jens Erat Jul 28 '12 at 22:29
    
Ranon, I believe that position() le 3 is shorter, more efficient and more readable. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 28 '12 at 22:33
    
I chose the range expression as it is more general. If only interested in ranges starting from the beginning, I agree on using le. –  Jens Erat Jul 28 '12 at 22:43
    
Ranon, a general comparison between an (integer) item and an sequence of contigous integers is always substantially more inefficient (O(N)) than $item ge $seq[1] and $item le $seq[last()] -- the latter being O(1). –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 28 '12 at 22:55

how about using regex's with fn:replace and capturing groups?

it has the advantage of making you feel more bad ass by using regex's rather than manually tokenizing the string =D

let $s := 'This is first sentence. This is second sentence. This is third sentence. This is 4th sentence.'

let $adjust-this-regex-as-needed := '([\w\s]+)\.([\w\s]+)\.([\w\s]+)\.([\w\s]+)\.'
return (
    fn:replace($s, $adjust-this-regex-as-needed , '$1'),     (: first sentence :)
    fn:replace($s, $adjust-this-regex-as-needed , '$2  $3')  (: last two sentences :)
)

([\w\s]+)\. --> means match all letters and spaces up to a period

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