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The following is a simplified example of my scenario (which is very common it seems);

#include <signal.h>

void doMath(int &x, int &y);
void signal_handler(int signal);

int main() {
  signal (SIGINT,signal_handler);
  int x = 10;
  int y;
  doMath(x,y);
  while(1);
  return 0;
}

void doMath(int &x, int &y) {
  for(int y=0; y<=x; y++) {
    cout << y << endl;
  } 
  return;
}

void signalHandler(int signal){
  doMath(x,y);
  exit(1);
}

This basic program prints 1 to 10 on the screen and just hangs there until CTRL+C is pressed. At this point I want the doMath() function to run again. The only way I can see this happening is if I pass x and y to signalhandler() so it can then pass them onto doMath(), and a reference to the doMath() function also.

It my actual program there are two doMath() functions and many more variables, I would like a final dump of the variable values. So, it seems like an inefficient way passing all those variables to signalHandler to then be passed on to the two functions. Is there another way around this?

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How about setting the program such that ctrl-c doesn't interrrupt it, and reading it like a regular character? –  Vaughn Cato Jul 28 '12 at 14:24
    
What is the point of using ctrl-c? Why not have them press enter? –  Vaughn Cato Jul 28 '12 at 14:29
    
Well at a later date the program will be doing more, so it has to be on CTRL+C (as in when the program is killed), I want a final dump of values at the point of terminations –  jwbensley Jul 28 '12 at 14:29
    
I think you'll need to use global variables. –  Vaughn Cato Jul 28 '12 at 14:32
    
I thought that, but I was told they are bad! Very naughty :D –  jwbensley Jul 28 '12 at 14:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you'll need to use a global variable.

While global variables should be avoided in general, sometimes there is no other choice. Try to use as few as possible and document their use clearly:

#include <signal.h>

void signalHandler(int signal);
void doMath(int &x, int &y);

struct DoMathArgs {
  int x;
  int y;

  void callDoMath() { doMath(x,y); }
};



// We have to use this global variable to pass the arguments to doMath when
// the signal is caught, since the signal handler isn't passed any arguments
// that we can use for our own data.
DoMathArgs global_do_math_args;

int main() {
  signal (SIGINT,signalHandler);
  global_do_math_args.x = 10;
  global_do_math_args.callDoMath();
  doSomethingForever();
  return 0;
}


void signalHandler(int signal) {
  global_do_math_args.callDoMath();
  exit(1);
}

void doMath(int &x, int &y) {
  for(int y=0; y<=x; y++) {
    cout << y << endl;
  } 
  return;
}
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This code works, but it's really more C than C++. Why not make a class that holds the args, and has DoMath functions - one that takes two arguments and one that takes none. The second one just calls the first using the args it holds. –  Kate Gregory Aug 19 '12 at 13:53
    
@KateGregory: I went half-way. I do think that making a member function is a good approach, since it makes the relationship more obvious between the global variable and its use. However, I'm leaving the doMath function as standalone, so that the relationship to the original code is clearer. –  Vaughn Cato Aug 19 '12 at 14:14

A much more efficient approach would to define an event, wait on it in main, set it off in the signal, and after waiting call doMath in main again.

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