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I'm adding a git log line to my deploy script:

git pull origin master
git log -n 1 > lastcommit.txt
ant -f build.xml deploy

to save details of the last commit. This produces an output file (at time of writing):

commit 3ced14ef1004287b55c21d384447c21cb58edfa6
Merge: 616a15e 5adc9c5
Author: www-data <www-data@backup.agilebase.co.uk>
Date:   Sat Jul 28 15:20:39 2012 +0100

Merge branch 'master' of github.com:okohll/agileBase

However, using that commit code https://github.com/okohll/agileBase/commits/3ced14ef1004287b55c21d384447c21cb58edfa6 returns a 404 not found error.

I must have misunderstood git log, I want to find the commit hash that will link to the last commit in github's web interface. Is there a way to do that? What does 3ced14ef1004287b55c21d384447c21cb58edfa6 refer to?

I notice that the 'Merge' line has at the end 5adc9c5 which is the start of the actual code I'm looking for, at time of writing 5adc9c51326772318394fceb479a31e26306259b.

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p.s. The author of the last pushed commit is okohll, not www-data. It looks like git log is showing a local commit that hasn't been pushed yet. So the question is is there a way to get the last commit ID from master, not the local repository? –  Oliver Kohll Jul 28 '12 at 14:45
    
The url path part is commit, not commits, and it looks like you haven't pushed that commit back to github yet. github.com/okohll/agileBase/commit/… –  Matt Ball Jul 28 '12 at 14:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your git pull merged what was on github and what was in your repository into a new commit. That is 3ced14ef1004287b55c21d384447c21cb58edfa6. This merge commit is not on github (yet). If you want to refer to that, you will need to push back to github.

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Correct - and additionally, the URL path part is commit, not commits. –  Matt Ball Jul 28 '12 at 14:47
    
Good point. I didn't notice that. –  Noufal Ibrahim Jul 28 '12 at 14:49
    
OK thanks, so how do I get the most recent merge that is on github? –  Oliver Kohll Jul 28 '12 at 14:50
    
You could do a git fetch and then find the hash of origin/master (assuming that origin is the remote which points to github and master is the branch there that you're interested in). –  Noufal Ibrahim Jul 28 '12 at 14:51
    
That seems to do it: 'git fetch' then 'git log --remotes -n 1' –  Oliver Kohll Jul 28 '12 at 14:53

https://github.com/okohll/agileBase/commits/3ced14ef1004287b55c21d384447c21cb58edfa6 returns a 404 not found error.

In general, the URL is http://github.com/<user>/<project>/commit/<sha1>, i.e. a singular commit

I want to find the commit hash that will link to the last commit in github's web interface.

You don’t need to pull that out of your repository first, you can just link to HEAD on GitHub: https://github.com/okohll/agileBase/commit/HEAD

If you still want to find out what the current commit is you have in your GitHub repository, you can simply use the log for the remote branch, i.e. origin/master:

git log -1 origin/master

This however requires that you fetched from the remote repository recently as it will only check what you have in your local repository.

Other than that, the only option option left would be to check GitHub directly to get the current hash, possibly with the GitHub API.

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Yes, but I want the last commit ID at the time the script was run, not the current HEAD –  Oliver Kohll Jul 28 '12 at 14:52
    
Thanks, Noufal Ibrahim just gave the same answer –  Oliver Kohll Jul 28 '12 at 15:04
    
I would try to avoid using the API. It will tie your setup to github and you cannot move to another setup. Best stick with pure git. –  Noufal Ibrahim Jul 28 '12 at 15:06
    
@NoufalIbrahim: If the requirement is to get the URL to GitHub showing the current commit as the time of running the script, then I would think relying on GitHub there wouldn’t be a problem at all. –  poke Jul 28 '12 at 17:50
    
Quite possibly. –  Noufal Ibrahim Jul 29 '12 at 5:03

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