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I have a question about copy constructors. I see these examples on internet. the first one says without copy constructors if you change something on student2 the same field change also on student1. but on the second examples changes on student2 doesn't affect student1 because of copy constructor. I didn't understand how this happened, what actually copy constructors do here? (sorry for bad english) (thanks for all answers :) )

class MITStudent {
public:
    int studentID;
    char *name;
    MITStudent() {
        studentID = 0;
        name = "";
}

};
   int main() {
      MITStudent student1;
      student1.studentID = 98;
      char n[] = "foo";
      student1.name = n;
      MITStudent student2 = student1;
      student2.name[0] = 'b';
      cout << student1.name; // boo
 }

second one

class MITStudent {
public:
    int studentID;
    char *name;
    MITStudent() {
        studentID = 0;
        name = "";
    }

    MITStudent(MITStudent &o) {
        name = my_strdup(o.name);
        studentID = o.studentID;
    }

};
int main() {
   MITStudent student1;
   student1.studentID = 98;
   char n[] = "foo";
   student1.name = n;
   MITStudent student2 = student1;
   student2.name[0] = 'b';
   cout << student1.name; // foo

}

share|improve this question
    
Nothing related to question. I suggest using std::string. –  Mahesh Jul 28 '12 at 16:00

5 Answers 5

Default copy constructors are generated automatically if you don't specify your own.
They just copy all the class'es members by value to the new class.

The problem usually arises when you have pointers as class members.
The default copy constructor will just copy the address that his held by the pointer.
This means that both the original and the copied class now point at the same object.

That's exactly what happens in your example with the char* "string"...

BTW, as a thumb rule.. if you have a class that has pointers as members, create a custom copy constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not so sure that's a great rule of thumb, because in the kinds of classes where pointers are used and custom copy constructors are required, the better rule is almost always to get rid of those pointers because there are classes in the standard library that will suit the purpose better. So, in the few remaining places where pointers are actually useful (non-owning reassignable references is all I use them for), custom copy constructors are not needed. –  Benjamin Lindley Jul 28 '12 at 16:17
    
It's true that you should try to avoid pointers altogether, but you can't really. And if you use shared_ptr it becomes pretty safe and handy. But, you'll still have to define a copy constructor so you can define the right behavior with the pointers. –  Yochai Timmer Jul 28 '12 at 16:22
2  
I am not saying you should try to avoid pointers altogether. I am saying that in most of the places where you would be expected to write a custom copy constructor because of a pointer (for example, because you wanted a dynamic array), those are the places specifically where you should not be using a pointer (because the standard library has a class for dynamic arrays, std::vector). In the few places that are left for pointers (non-owning reassignable references, we're talking raw pointers here), custom copy constructors are not needed. –  Benjamin Lindley Jul 28 '12 at 16:33

A copy constructor is automatically generated for you if you don't create one. The automatically generated copy constructor will just copy the pointer to the name and not the name itself. By creating your own constructor, you can manually copy the whole name, and not just the pointer.

In actual code, you would want to use something like std::string instead of a char* though. This way, the automatically generated copy constructor will do what you want, and you won't need to write your own.

share|improve this answer
    
but there are two constructors. –  user1559792 Jul 28 '12 at 15:55
    
@user1559792: Yes, there is a default constructor and a copy constructor in your example. –  Vaughn Cato Jul 28 '12 at 15:56

If there is no MITStudent(MITStudent &o) it is just copy values of all fields. So if there is a pointer field then both fields will contain the same adress.

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In the first example the copy constructor is implicitly created by the compiler.

It basically looks like this:

MITStudent(const MITStudent &o) {
    name = o.name;
    studentID = o.studentID;
}

It only copies the pointer name.

In the second example, the copy constructor is explicitly created and copies the data that name is pointing to. This way, name in student2 is pointing to the copied data.

share|improve this answer
    
const is quite the missing. –  Puppy Jul 28 '12 at 16:00
    
oh sorry about that :P fixed –  Man of One Way Jul 28 '12 at 16:00

In a typical case, with a default copy constructor, the situation will be as given in the left side of the picture!. A copy constructor is implemented to avoid this and have a scenario as given in the right side.

However, usually this happens with pointer members. So, avoid them as much as possible. Use them only if you 1. Can create a member only after a later stage than the constructor 2. Want to destroy a member and recreate it 3. Want to make the member outlive the object.

In your case, it doesn't look like you are in any of the above scenarios. In this case, you can safely use nice string object and you don't have to worry about any dangling pointers.

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