Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a question about Parsing Trees:

I have a string (math expresion estring), for example: (a+b)*c-(d-e)*f/g. I have to parse that expression in a Tree:

class Exp{};
class Term: public Exp{
    int n_;
}

class Node: Public Exp{
    Exp* loperator_;
    Exp* roperator_;
    char operation; // +, -, *, /
}

What algorithm can I use to build a tree which represents the expresion string above?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Which Data Structure used to solve a simple math equation –  Mooing Duck Jul 29 '12 at 14:32

5 Answers 5

Use the Shunting-yard algorithm. The wikipedia description is quite comprehensive, I hope it will suffice.

You can also try to write a formal grammar, for example a parsing-expression grammar, and use a tool to generate a parser. This site about PEGs lists 3 C/C++ libraries for PEG parsing.

share|improve this answer
    
never seen shunting yard before, thats a clever way to avoid RDP's recursion. –  Mooing Duck Jul 29 '12 at 14:23

First step is to write a grammar for your expressions. Second step for such a simple case is to write a recursive descent parser, that's the algorithm I would recommend. Here's the wiki page on recursive descent parsers which has a good looking C implementation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recursive_descent_parser

share|improve this answer

(a+b)*c-(d-e)*f/g is an in-fix expression.

To easily make a tree, convert that into a Prefix expression first.

From the Example, prefix of (A * B) + (C / D) is + (* A B) (/ C D)

     (+)            
     / \        
    /   \       
  (*)    (/)         
  / \   /  \        
 A   B C    D   

 ((A*B)+(C/D))  

Your tree then looks has + as its root node. You can continue populating the left and right sub-tree, about each operator.

Also, this link explains Recursive Descent Parsing in detail, and can be implemented.

share|improve this answer
3  
How is that immediate step of translation helpful? –  Kos Jul 28 '12 at 17:33
    
I really thought the OP was looking for this. He can build his tree from the prefix expression with ease IMO. –  Anirudh Ramanathan Jul 28 '12 at 17:41
1  
He has to parse the infix to build the prefix, so this doesnt help at all. –  Mooing Duck Jul 29 '12 at 14:04
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cctype>
#include <iterator>

using namespace std;

class Exp{
public:
//  Exp(){}
    virtual void print(){}
    virtual void release(){}
};
class Term: public Exp {
    string val;
public:
    Term(string v):val(v){}
    void print(){
        cout << ' ' << val << ' ';
    }
    void release(){}
};

class Node: public Exp{
    Exp *l_exp;
    Exp *r_exp;
    char op; // +, -, *, /
public:
    Node(char op, Exp* left, Exp* right):op(op),l_exp(left), r_exp(right){}
    ~Node(){
    }
    void print(){
        cout << '(' << op << ' ';
        l_exp->print();
        r_exp->print();
        cout  << ')';
    }
    void release(){
        l_exp->release();
        r_exp->release();
        delete l_exp;
        delete r_exp;
    }
};

Exp* strToExp(string &str){
    int level = 0;//inside parentheses check
    //case + or -
    //most right '+' or '-' (but not inside '()') search and split
    for(int i=str.size()-1;i>=0;--i){
        char c = str[i];
        if(c == ')'){
            ++level;
            continue;
        }
        if(c == '('){
            --level;
            continue;
        }
        if(level>0) continue;
        if((c == '+' || c == '-') && i!=0 ){//if i==0 then s[0] is sign
            string left(str.substr(0,i));
            string right(str.substr(i+1));
            return new Node(c, strToExp(left), strToExp(right));
        }
    }
    //case * or /
    //most right '*' or '/' (but not inside '()') search and split
    for(int i=str.size()-1;i>=0;--i){
        char c = str[i];
        if(c == ')'){
            ++level;
            continue;
        }
        if(c == '('){
            --level;
            continue;
        }
        if(level>0) continue;
        if(c == '*' || c == '/'){
            string left(str.substr(0,i));
            string right(str.substr(i+1));
            return new Node(c, strToExp(left), strToExp(right));
        }
    }
    if(str[0]=='('){
    //case ()
    //pull out inside and to strToExp
        for(int i=0;i<str.size();++i){
            if(str[i]=='('){
                ++level;
                continue;
            }
            if(str[i]==')'){
                --level;
                if(level==0){
                    string exp(str.substr(1, i-1));
                    return strToExp(exp);
                }
                continue;
            }
        }
    } else
    //case value
        return new Term(str);
cerr << "Error:never execute point" << endl;
    return NULL;//never
}

int main(){
    string exp(" ( a + b ) * c - ( d - e ) * f / g");
    //remove space character
    exp.erase(remove_if(exp.begin(), exp.end(), ::isspace), exp.end());
    Exp *tree = strToExp(exp);
    tree->print();
    tree->release();
    delete tree;
}
//output:(- (* (+  a  b ) c )(/ (* (-  d  e ) f ) g ))
share|improve this answer
3  
wall of code with no comments or descriptive text? –  Mooing Duck Jul 29 '12 at 14:06
    
also note that a prefix tree has no need of parenthesis –  Mooing Duck Jul 29 '12 at 14:09
    
strToExp is better to use another function may subcontract. –  BLUEPIXY Jul 29 '12 at 14:10
    
@MooingDuck "prefix tree":Nothing more than a mere representation for printing. –  BLUEPIXY Jul 29 '12 at 14:12
    
Do you need something more than this description? –  BLUEPIXY Jul 29 '12 at 14:16

You can use this grammar to create your expression.

exp:
    /* empty */
  | non_empty_exp { print_exp(); }
  ;
non_empty_exp:
    mult_div_exp
  | add_sub_exp
  ;
mult_div_exp:
    primary_exp
  | mult_div_exp '*' primary_exp { push_node('*'); }
  | mult_div_exp '/' primary_exp { push_node('/'); }
  ;
add_sub_exp:
    non_empty_exp '+' mult_div_exp { push_node('+'); }
  | non_empty_exp '-' mult_div_exp { push_node('-'); }
  ;
primary_exp:
  | '(' non_empty_exp ')'
  | NUMBER { push_term($1); }
  ;

And the following for your lexer.

[ \t]+   {}
[0-9]+   { yylval.number = atoi(yytext); return NUMBER; }
[()]     { return *yytext; }
[*/+-]   { return *yytext; }

The expression is built as you go, using these routines:

std::list<Exp *> exps;

/* push a term onto expression stack */
void push_term (int n) {
    Term *t = new Term;
    t->n_ = n;
    exps.push_front(t);
}

/* push a node onto expression stack, top two in stack are its children */
void push_node (char op) {
    Node *n = new Node;
    n->operation_ = op;
    n->roperator_ = exps.front();
    exps.pop_front();
    n->loperator_ = exps.front();
    exps.pop_front();
    exps.push_front(n);
}

/*
 * there is only one expression left on the stack, the one that was parsed
 */
void print_exp () {
    Exp *e = exps.front();
    exps.pop_front();
    print_exp(e);
    delete e;
}

The following routine can pretty print your expression tree:

static void
print_exp (Exp *e, std::string ws = "", std::string prefix = "") {
    Term *t = dynamic_cast<Term *>(e);
    if (t) { std::cout << ws << prefix << t->n_ << std::endl; }
    else {
        Node *n = dynamic_cast<Node *>(e);
        std::cout << ws << prefix << "'" << n->operation_ << "'" << std::endl;
        if (prefix.size()) {
            ws += (prefix[1] == '|' ? " |" : "  ");
            ws += "  ";
        }
        print_exp(n->loperator_, ws, " |- ");
        print_exp(n->roperator_, ws, " `- ");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
what is everyone's obsession with prefix trees? –  Mooing Duck Jul 29 '12 at 14:13
    
@MooingDuck: Edited. Regards –  jxh Jul 29 '12 at 15:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.