Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using the module HTML::Template to create a formatted table like this (using array @rows):

my $tmpl = HTML::Template->new(filehandle => \*DATA);
$tmpl->param(ROWS => \@rows); 
print $tmpl->output;

__DATA__ 
<table border="1"> 
<TMPL_LOOP ROWS> 
  <tr> 
  <TMPL_LOOP CELLS> 
    <td><TMPL_VAR CELL></td> 
  </TMPL_LOOP>
  </tr> 
</TMPL_LOOP>
</table>

However I now want to create hyperlinks of some of the elements of the table. The address the element is linked to depends on the text of that cell as well as the column of the table.. Example: If a row has the elements Home, Office, Travel, Play then I would like them to be linked to www.mywebsite.com/Home, www.mywebsite2.com/Office and www.mywebsite3.com/Play with no hyperlink for Travel. How can I create such hyperlinks in the HTML::Template created table?

share|improve this question
    
Couldn't you just do something like <td><a href="mywebsite.com/<TMPL_VAR CELL>"><TMPL_VAR CELL></a></td> –  Lone Shepherd Jul 28 '12 at 18:14
    
@LoneShepherd Please see the edited question. –  user828647 Jul 28 '12 at 19:51

1 Answer 1

Edit: Rewritten answer to use Template::Toolkit based upon the updated question and comments by the question's author.

# Your app sets up whatever data structure it wants to pass to the tempalte, for example,
my @rows = [
    [ # cells in row #1
        { url => 'www.mywebsite.com/Home', label => 'Home' },
        { url => 'www.mywebsite2.com/Office', label => 'Office' },
    ],
    [ # cells in row #2
        { url => 'www.mywebsite3.com/Play', label => 'Play' },
        { label => 'Travel' },
    ],
];

# No need to print, prints to STDOUT automatically by default
my $tmpl = Template->new;
$tmpl->process(\*DATA, { rows => \@rows })
    || die $tmpl->error();

__DATA__ 
<table border="1">
[% FOR row IN rows %] 
  <tr> 
  [% FOR cell IN row %] 
    <td>
    [% IF cell.url %]
      <a href="http://[% cell.url | url %]">[% cell.label | html %]</a>
    [% ELSE %]
      [% cell.label | html %]
    [% END %]
    </td> 
  [% END %]
  </tr> 
[% END %]
</table>

Template::Toolkit has many of the same capabilities as Perl (actually exactly the same if you enable Perl blocks, but I don't recommend that).

Inside of each [% %] you put in a directive. If there's no directive and no assignment performed using =, that block is treated as a variable lookup and that value passed into your template is interpolated into the text there. When doing a variable lookup, you can descend through an entire complex data structure using periods to separate the lookups. For example,

[% rows.0.0.label %]

inserted in the example above, would output "Home".

The | url and | html notation shown above adds filters that will clean up the output to make sure the values inside the [% %] blocks are output as proper URLs or HTML (generally avoiding XSS and other output format errors).

Template Toolkit is a little fuzzy and imprecise about how it does things sometime, even less strict than Perl, so you have to be a little careful sometimes. It can also be a bit of a performance problem, especially if you call process() lots of times in your app (embedding templates one in another tends to be quite a bit faster). However, it does a reasonably good job at most template problems and the interface is not too scary if you need to work with web designers.

If you use Template::Toolkit, I strongly recommend reading through the tutorial to get a feel for it.

Original Answer:

Lone Shepherd's comment is the answer:

I am using the module HTML::Template to create a formatted table like this (using array @rows):

my $tmpl = HTML::Template->new(filehandle => \*DATA);
$tmpl->param(ROWS => \@rows); 
print $tmpl->output;

__DATA__ 
<table border="1"> 
<TMPL_LOOP ROWS> 
  <tr> 
  <TMPL_LOOP CELLS> 
    <td><a href="http://www.mywebsite.com/<TMPL_VAR CELL ESCAPE=HTML>"><TMPL_VAR CELL ESCAPE=HTML></a></td> 
  </TMPL_LOOP>
  </tr> 
</TMPL_LOOP>
</table>

Just add the HTML for your hyperlinks. According to the documentation for HTML::Template, you can place the <TMPL_VAR ...> bits inside of attributes.

As a side note, adding ESCAPE=HTML is a good idea as well unless you're certain you've already sanitized your output (prevents things like cross-site scripting attacks on your web application).

share|improve this answer
    
@LoneShepherd Oops, I did not make myself clear enough. Please see the edited question. –  user828647 Jul 28 '12 at 19:50
1  
That's more than I know about HTML::Template. I usually use Template::Toolkit or something else. Someone else will have to answer how to do lookup tables or more complicated conditions unless you want a Template::Toolkit answer. –  zostay Jul 29 '12 at 2:22
    
Ok, I am ready to use another module if HTML::Template cannot do the job. But you will have to explain a bit, I have never used Template::Toolkit before. –  user828647 Jul 29 '12 at 9:04
    
+1 for pushing something a module that doesn't suck. –  Evan Carroll Jul 30 '12 at 0:27
    
+1 Thanks for the explanation! In the meantime I managed a workaround using javascript. I'll give this module a try now. –  user828647 Jul 31 '12 at 20:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.