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I have a pretty decent understanding of Jquery but decided to dig in inside JavaScript because I have no understanding of "raw" JavaScript.
So here's my problem: on document load my function executes fine and alerts: 'Hi my name is John' but on button click it alert's just :'Hi my name is'. My question is why is this happening and how can I solve it?
I know that I can FIX IT by putting my variable INSIDE my function, but is there a way to call my FIRST variable declared outside my function (variable just after script type)?

Fiddle here
My code:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">

//If I try to call this variable WILL NOT WORK:(

var name ='John'; <--SO HOW CAN I CALL THIS VARIABLE TO MY CLICK FUNCTION?--> 

function displayName(name)
{
//If I put my variable like this WILL WORK fine...
//var name ='John';
alert('Hi I am '+name);

}

//This function works on document load
//displayName(name);
</script>
</head>
<body>

<!--This doesn't work well if variable is OUTSIDE my function:(-->
<button type="button" onclick="displayName(name)">Display Name</button>
</body>
</html>
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3 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Your code is actually fine, you've just chosen an unfortunate name for a global: name. If you change it to something else (like foo), it works: http://jsfiddle.net/6nuCx/1/

The reason for that is a bit obscure. Global variables become properties of the window object. But the window object already has a property called name, which is the name of the window. I'm very surprised to find that your code didn't work, because I would have expected your code to overwrite the window's name. But apparently not. (This is a great example of why it's best to avoid global variables.) Anyway, choosing a different variable name, one that doesn't conflict with the existing name property, sorts it out.

But you did something in your code that may be non-obvious, so let's dig into it a bit more deeply (here I'm using the foo version to avoid confusion):

// Here, you're defining a global variable called `foo`
var foo ='John';

// Here you have a global function, `displayName`, which accepts an
// *argument* named `foo`
function displayName(foo)
{
    // Here, within the function, the symbol `foo` refers to the
    // *argument*, not to the global. The global is *hidden* by
    // the argument (this is called "shadowing" -- the local
    // "shadows" the global).
    alert('Hi I am '+foo);
}

and in your HTML:

<!-- Here, `foo` refers to the global variable -->
<button type="button" onclick="displayName(foo)">Display Name</button>

It might be clearer if we change the name of that argument:

var foo ='John';

function displayName(f)
{
    alert('Hi I am '+f);
}

and the HTML is unchanged:

<!-- Here, `foo` refers to the global variable -->
<button type="button" onclick="displayName(foo)">Display Name</button>

Above I said it was best to avoid global variables, and that your problem was a great example of why. So how do we do that? Well, mostly by avoiding DOM0 handlers (like the one in your onclick). Here's how you might recast your fiddle: Live copy

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
<button id="theButton" type="button">Display Name</button>
<script type="text/javascript">
// Start a "scoping function"
(function() {
    // Everything within this function is local to the function,
    // not global
    var name = 'John';

    function displayName(n)
    {
        alert('Hi I am ' + n);
    }

    // Instead of the onclick= in the markup, hook up here in
    // the code
    document.getElementById("theButton").onclick = function() {
        displayName(name);
    };
})();
</script>
</body>
</html>

Note how we were free to use name, because we aren't creating or interacting with globals. Also note that I put the code after the button, because the code assumes the button already exists.

Better yet, use addEventListener or attachEvent to hook up the handler.

var btn = document.getElementById("theButton");
if (btn.addEventListener) {
    btn.addEventListener("click", handler, false);
}
else if (btn.attachEvent) {
    btn.attachEvent("onclick", handler);
}
else {
    // Punt!
    btn.onclick = handler;
}

function handler() {
    display(name);
}

As you can see, we have to handle both, because older versions of IE (or newer ones in "compatibility mode") don't have addEventListener. Which is one reason for using libraries like jQuery, but I understand you're trying to expand your understanding without one, and for good reason. Best on that!


And finally, you asked:

I know that I can FIX IT by putting my variable INSIDE my function, but is there a way to call my FIRST variable declared outside my function (variable just after script type)?

None of the above answers that. :-) The answer is: Yes, you can just refer to it directly, by removing the argument that shadowed the global: Live example

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
var foo ='John';

// Note: No argument declared
function displayName()
{
    // Because the argument doesn't shadow it, we can refer
    // to foo, because foo is declared in an *enclosing
    // context*
    alert('Hi I am '+foo);
}
</script>
</head>
<body>
<!-- Note we don't pass any argument ------v -->
<button type="button" onclick="displayName()">Display Name</button>
</body>
</html>
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@Crowder brilliant –  codingbiz Jul 28 '12 at 17:52
    
Very NICE answer! I appreciate it THX!! –  Dejo Dekic Jul 28 '12 at 17:54
    
This is good! The other thing though was that the OP couldn't access the global variable because it was shadowed by a local var. But since he passed the global var with the function call it should have worked anyway. –  Torsten Walter Jul 28 '12 at 17:56
    
@DejoDekic: You're welcome! I added a note at the end answering a question in your question I didn't see at first. Best, –  T.J. Crowder Jul 28 '12 at 18:08
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Arhhh got beaten, was going to say using name is a bad choice:

http://jsfiddle.net/6nuCx/7/

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Try This:

var name ='John'; 

function displayName()
{
alert('Hi I am '+name);

}

</script>
</head>
<body>

<button type="button" onclick="displayName()">Display Name</button>
</body>
</html>
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