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I have a very simple function

function filefinder
{
  FILE=$1; test -f $FILE || FILE=`find . -name $FILE`; /usr/bin/geany $FILE
}
alias geany=filefinder

But I would like other editors to use the same function. How can I do that? Say, I would like to add alias nano=filefinder. Obviously I wouldn't like to hardwire either geany or nano.

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about:

function filefinder
    {
        FILE=$2; ED=$1; test -f $FILE || FILE=`find . -name $FILE`; /usr/bin/$ED $FILE;
    }
    alias geany="filefinder geany"
    alias gedit="filefinder gedit"
    alias nano="filefinder nano"

I assumed your distro keeps all the execs in /usr/bin

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I will accept this if something more elegant doesn't surface. –  chx Jul 28 '12 at 20:14
    
In theory, you can use $FUNCNAME to get the name of a function that is being called, or ${FUNCNAME[0]} to get the same thing, or ${FUNCNAME[1]} to get the name of the function that called you. So, in theory, you could do what you wanted by using ${FUNCNAME[1]} instead of ED=$1 in the script above if you use 'function' instead of 'alias' to define your editor-specific variants. In practice, I could not get that to work, so I think the answer presented by Met is probably best. –  greg_1_anderson Jul 28 '12 at 23:11
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The usual way to do this sort of thing is with the variables that are commonly used to hold the name of the user's preferred editor.

function filefinder {
  editor=${VISUAL:-$EDITOR}; editor=${editor:-emacs}; FILE=$1; test -f "$FILE" || FILE=$(find . -name "$FILE"); "$editor" "$FILE"
}

This follows what Bash does when you use the readline function edit-and-execute-command.

If $VISUAL is set use it, if not use $EDITOR. It that's not set, use emacs as the fallback (you could use something else if you want, of course).

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Dennis gets extra points for being the first person to point out that you should be quoting $FILE. –  ryran Jul 29 '12 at 20:51
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How about an environment variable?:

function filefinder
{
  if [ -z "$MY_EDITOR" ];then 
    echo "MY_EDITOR is not set";
  else  
    FILE=$1; test -f $FILE || FILE=`find . -name $FILE`; $MY_EDITOR $FILE
  fi
}

alias myedit=filefinder
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How this will work for two editors? I was looking for something like $0 $FILE but that doesn't work. –  chx Jul 28 '12 at 19:54
    
chx - for something like this, you would do MY_EDITOR=vim filefinder file.txt. If you used EDITOR instead, it may be already set to the user's preferred editor. –  jordanm Jul 29 '12 at 2:42
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