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Say I want to add a set of related, but independent, features to Twitter's (magically open source) iPhone app. While in the app, you can hit "Home Automation" and be presented with a screenful of buttons for controlling features in your home: Lights; Television; Temperature; Shades; and Music.

What is the ideal branching model in Git for developing this suite of features?

Here are some assumptions:

  • One person (the same person) will be developing all of the features.
  • Twitter encourages rebasing as its integration model.
  • All the features share some base code.

And here are my nice-to-haves for the model, although I'd love to hear all the model options:

  • It should be easy for code reviewers to review each feature independently at the end. In other words, someone reviewing the Lights code shouldn't have to deal with any changes made while implementing Television.

  • Each feature should have nice, clean history during development. When looking at foo.m while working on Lights, I should only see changes made to implement Lights, not changes made to implement Television.

  • I can still compile and test Lights even if I've left Television in a messy/broken state.

One requirement for the model is that I need to be able to generate testing builds on a regular basis that have all the features integrated, just as they'll be presented to users. In other words, when I run my test build, I see a Home Automation screen containing every feature.

My original instinct here was to set up the branches like this:

Twitter
    \
     Automation
        \
         Lights
        \
         Television
        \
         Temperature
        \
         ...

In other words, I'd branch from Twitter to create the "Automation" branch, which contains the shared code that all the home automation features use, including stub code for the overview UI from which you access the features (i.e. the "screenful of buttons" referenced above). And then I'd create a series of branches from Automation, one for each feature.

However, in this model, I'm having trouble understanding how I would produce my fully integrated testing builds in this world. I imagine I would need to create some other branch that regularly merges the Lights/Television/etc branches together. But there will be obvious conflicts in this merge.

For instance, imagine that the shared UI code in the Automation branch has a function num_buttons_to_render that returns the number of buttons to render in the Home Automation UI. The Automation branch would return 0 here, since it doesn't implement any of the features itself. Each child branch (Lights, Television, etc) would return 1, since they're only implementing their own respective workflows and don't care about the other features. But the testing branch would want to return 5 here, since it wants to render all 5 automation features (Lights, Television, Temperature, Shades and Music). So I'd want to fix that conflict in the testing branch once and then continue to integrate subsequent changes from all the feature branches over time. But it's not even clear to me that I can do that, since all the feature branches are using a rebase model as dictated by Twitter's development standards.

I am new to git, so I hope I'm making some sense here. If not, I'll be here to proactively answer any follow up questions. Thanks so much for your help!

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1 Answer 1

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I imagine I would need to create some other branch that regularly merges the Lights/Television/etc branches together.

That sounds plausible.

But there will be obvious conflicts in this merge.

So deal with them. Better to do it sooner rather than later.

But the testing branch would want to return 5 here, since it wants to render all 5 automation features (Lights, Television, Temperature, Shades and Music). So I'd want to fix that conflict in the testing branch once and then continue to integrate subsequent changes from all the feature branches over time.

Why should that be a conflict?

Why not have each feature call a function to register itself, which increments the count of features. If no features call the function, the count is zero. If one calls it, the count is one. If five call it, the count is five. That seems better than having a hard-coded counter somewhere, which has a different value in different branches.

I don't see any problem with your suggested branching model, the only problem you've described is unrelated to git and can be solved by improving the code design.

But it's not even clear to me that I can do that, since all the feature branches are using a rebase model as dictated by Twitter's development standards.

Maybe I'm missing something, but I don't see why that's a problem. If you periodically rebase Automation from the upstream code, then rebase each feature branch from Automation (not from upstream), then there'd be no problem with merging back from the feature branches to the Automation branch.

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Thanks Jonathan. On the issue of code design: I could do the registration model you describe, but it seems odd to alter my architecture just to suit my development workflow. Such a registration system seems to make more sense to me if I were building an extensible/dynamic system that others could plug into, but I'm not. There's ultimately a fixed number of features. Put differently: If I were designing this all on one branch, would I complicate the architecture with this registration system? Probably not, right? –  Aaron Jul 28 '12 at 23:05
    
Re: "it's not clear that I can do that since they're using the rebase model" -- I didn't follow your answer. You said you saw no problem merging back from feature branches to Automation, but that's not what I'm referring to. Instead, I'm referring to having some release/testing branch that merges all the feature branches together. If my feature branches rebase off Automation (which rebase off upstream), wouldn't I have to keep rebasing all the feature branches into my release branch every time I want to generate a release build, which means continually re-resolving the same conflicts? –  Aaron Jul 28 '12 at 23:09
    
(To be clear, I agree that there's no issue merging back from a feature branch to Automation. But I'd only want to do that when I'm done with the given feature. In the interim, I'd want to be able to generate release/testing builds that integrate all the features, which I'm assuming would take place on a different branch.) –  Aaron Jul 28 '12 at 23:11
    
OK, I see your points. For the registration bit first: I don't think a hard-coded int num_features=5 is a great design anyway. There's no reason the registration system needs to be complicated, it could just be a container of pointers/references to the feature code and each feature adds itself to the container. –  Jonathan Wakely Jul 28 '12 at 23:22
    
For the rebasing: part of my point is I don't see why there should be many conflicts in the first place that need more than trivial resolution. Once you do resolve them, you could make a common change in the Automation branch, or in the features branches, so that next time you merge to the testing branch there's no conflict. i.e. don't allow conflicting code to remain in each branch. If not doing so makes the development process difficult then it's not artificially compromising your design to suit your workflow: the development model is a constraint on the design that it should reflect –  Jonathan Wakely Jul 28 '12 at 23:26

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