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   typedef struct {
      void *elems;//address of the memory block
      int elemSize; //
      int logicLen;//number of existing elements in vector
      int allocLen;//allocated space for the vector
  } vector;

  static void InsertNumbers(vector *numbers, long n, long d)
  {
    long k;
    long residue;

    for (k = 0; k < d; k++) {
      residue = (long) (((long long)k * (long long) n) % d);
      VectorAppend(numbers, &residue);
    }
  }



void VectorAppend(vector *v, const void *elemAddr)
{
   void *target=(char*)v->elems + (v->logicLen * v->elemSize);

   if(v->logicLen==v->allocLen){
    v->allocLen*=2;
    v->elems=realloc(v->elems,v->allocLen*v->elemSize);
    assert(v->elems!=NULL);
   }
   memcpy(target,elemAddr,v->elemSize);
   v->logicLen++;
}

Then, I use the following sentence to call InsertNumbers()

vector aVector;
VectorNew(&aVector, sizeof(long),4);
long first=139269,second=3021377;
InsertNumbers(&aVector,first , second);

It seems like 3021377 is too big... in v->elems=realloc(v->elems,v->allocLen*v->elemSize); I find that when v->allocLen=4096, the program crashes and says:This may be due to a corruption of the heap why?

share|improve this question
1  
Can you show us more of the surrounding code? There's nothing wrong with that line. – Mysticial Jul 28 '12 at 20:21
1  
@Mysticial ptr=realloc(ptr, N); is always wrong although not likely the problem here. A minimal but complete example that shows the problem would be very useful though. – Flexo Jul 28 '12 at 20:22
1  
@Flexo: It's not wrong if it's followed by if (!ptr) abort(); or something like that, but yes, it's often wrong. – Dietrich Epp Jul 28 '12 at 20:23
    
@DietrichEpp it's always wrong because it can cause a memory-leak when the realloc retval is NULL, if there's no other pointer to what ptr points to – pb2q Jul 28 '12 at 20:24
1  
@pb2q: It is impossible to cause a memory leak in a program that is exiting, since exiting the program frees all memory. Not everyone wants to write error handling code for every allocation, when they're going to handle them all with abort(). – Dietrich Epp Jul 28 '12 at 20:26
up vote 7 down vote accepted

This is not a problem with the code you posted, this is a problem somewhere else.

What happens is your program corrupts the heap, and then realloc detects that the heap is corrupted.

You will want to detect the corruption as follows:

  1. Make sure you enable debugging symbols

  2. Run your program through Valgrind

Edit: There is a serious error is in the code you added.

void VectorAppend(vector *v, const void *elemAddr)
{
    void *target = (char *) v->elems + v->logicLen * v->elemSize;

    if (v->logicLen == v->allocLen) {
        v->allocLen *= 2;
        // Once you call 'realloc', the value of 'elems' might change
        // This means that 'target' is now INVALID
        // 'target' is based on the old value of 'elems'
        v->elems = realloc(v->elems,v->allocLen*v->elemSize);
        assert(v->elems != NULL);
    }
    memcpy(target, elemAddr, v->elemSize);
    v->logicLen++;
}

To fix it, move the calculation for target below the reallocation:

void VectorAppend(vector *v, const void *elemAddr)
{
    if (v->logicLen == v->allocLen) {
        v->allocLen *= 2;
        v->elems = realloc(v->elems,v->allocLen*v->elemSize);
        assert(v->elems != NULL);
    }
    void *target = (char *) v->elems + v->logicLen * v->elemSize;
    memcpy(target, elemAddr, v->elemSize);
    v->logicLen++;
}

Another error: There is an error in your comments, which is part of the code and I'd recommend taking comments seriously.

VectorNew(&aVector, sizeof(long), 4); // allocate 4*4 bytes 

The comment should not say, "allocate 4*4" bytes because that is misleading: someday you'll compile the program on a 64-bit system that isn't Windows, and it will be 8x4 bytes. You're better off removing the comment and just reading the code.

share|improve this answer
    
WOW.Thanks!Such a stupid mistake:) – mabeiyi Jul 28 '12 at 20:48

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