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I've run into a case where a sqlite query I'm expecting to return an error is actually succeeding and I was wondering if anyone could point out why this query is valid.

CREATE TABLE test_table(
  k INTEGER,
  v INTEGER
);

INSERT INTO test_table( k, v ) VALUES( 4, 5 );

SELECT * FROM(
  SELECT * FROM(
    SELECT k, v FROM test_table WHERE 1 = 0
  )
  UNION ALL
  SELECT * FROM(
    SELECT rowid, k, v FROM test_table
  )
)

sqlfiddle of above

I would think that unioning two selects which have a different number of columns would return an error. If I remove the outermost SELECT * then I receive the error I'm expecting: SELECTs to the left and right of UNION ALL do not have the same number of result columns.

share|improve this question
    
Looks like a quirk in SQLite! – Andomar Jul 28 '12 at 20:37
    
Weird - and what does it return? NULLs for the missing column? – Michael Berkowski Jul 28 '12 at 20:41
    
Oh I checked the demo and it omits the column. – Michael Berkowski Jul 28 '12 at 20:42
    
@Michael : It returns the rowid and k without any third column. – user1560123 Jul 28 '12 at 20:43
    
Why should the query be invalid? – user610650 Jul 29 '12 at 13:13

The answer to this seems to be straightforward: Yes, this is a quirk. I'd like to demonstrate this with a short example. But beforehand, let's consult the documentation:

Two or more simple SELECT statements may be connected together to form a compound SELECT using the UNION, UNION ALL, INTERSECT or EXCEPT operator. In a compound SELECT, all the constituent SELECTs must return the same number of result columns.

So the documentations says very clearly that two SELECTs must provide the same number of columns. However, as you said, the outermost SELECT strangely avoids this 'limitation'.

Example 1

SELECT * FROM(
    SELECT k, v FROM test_table
  UNION ALL
    SELECT k, v,rowid FROM test_table
);

Result:

k|v
4|5
4|5

The third column rowid gets simply omitted, as pointed out in the comments.

Example 2

We are only switching the order of the two select statements.

 SELECT * FROM(
    SELECT k, v, rowid FROM test_table
  UNION ALL
     SELECT k, v FROM test_table
  );

Result

k|v|rowid
4|5|1
4|5|

Now, sqlite does not omit the column but add a null value.

Conclusion

This brings me to my conclusion, that sqlite simply handles the UNION ALL differently if it is processed as a subquery.

PS: If you are just using UNION it fails at any scenario.

share|improve this answer

UNION ALL will return the results with null values in the extra columns.

A basic UNION will fail because UNION without the ALL has to have the same number of columns from both tables.

So:

SELECT column 1, column 2 FROM table a
UNION ALL 
SELECT column 1, column 2, column 3 FROM table b

returns 3 columns with nulls in column 3.

and:

SELECT column 1, column 2 FROM table a
UNION 
SELECT column 1, column 2, column 3 FROM table b

should fail because the number of columns do not match.

In conclusion you could add a blank column to the UNION so that you are selecting 3 columns from each table and it would still work.

EX:

SELECT column 1, column 2, '' AS 'column 3' FROM table a
UNION  
SELECT column 1, column 2, column 3 FROM table b
share|improve this answer
    
good approach!! – Nabeel Khan Mar 17 at 0:22

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