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I have a number of unspecified length followed by a 15-digit number.

For example:

(random number of unspecified length) + 15 digit number --> 3 + 15 digit number

(random number of unspecified length) + 15 digit number --> 32831 + 15 digit number

(random number of unspecified length) + 15 digit number --> 31 + 15 digit number

Can I use RegEx in Python to capture "Part 1" (where the length is uncertain) and the last 15 digits as "Part 2"?

share|improve this question
    
Can you give some realistic example input strings and show what you want to happen with those strings? Please also show what should happen with invalid inputs. And please show what you want to happen with the specific cases "01234567890123456ab" and "0123456789012345ab" as these are causing some people to write lots of comments and if you could clear this confusion up for us it would be great! –  Mark Byers Jul 28 '12 at 21:07
    
For example, given 4123456789123456, i want to capture the first digit (4) and the last 15 digits (123456789123456). Another example, given 4234123456789123456, i want to capture the first four digits (4234) and the last 15 digits (123456789123456). The main idea is to separate the last 15 digits from the first part (which will be of unspecified length). There will be no letters involved, only digits. Also, we can assume there will be at least 16 or more digits. –  goelv Jul 28 '12 at 21:10
    
Could there be whitespace or other numbers in the string, e.g. 123 4234123456789123456 123? Could there be invalid strings that shouldn't match as input, e.g. 1234? What should happen if there are exactly 15 digits in the string? –  Mark Byers Jul 28 '12 at 21:11
    
nope, there cannot be whitespace or any invalid characters. The expression will only contain numbers and nothing else. –  goelv Jul 28 '12 at 21:12
    
@MarkByers The OP is using this for Django URLs (as stated in a comment on my question) so strings that don't fit should just not match. –  Lattyware Jul 28 '12 at 21:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Sure, use regex (\d*)(\d{15}), or overkill (?<!\d)(\d*)(\d{15})(?!\d)

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what does the * specify? –  goelv Jul 28 '12 at 21:05
    
@goelv - * means any length, 0 or more –  Ωmega Jul 28 '12 at 21:08
    
* is referring to the fact that there are "zero or more instances of the preceding \d" - use a + if there is going to be at least one digit of the number of unspecified length –  gnr Jul 28 '12 at 21:10
    
@gnr - No need to change * to +, even if there will be always at least one, as * will do that anyway... –  Ωmega Jul 28 '12 at 21:11
    
Just to clarify (sorry, I'm new at this!), the * will repeatedly search for (\d) until the next expression (\d{15}) can be used? So for instance, if i have a 4 digit number followed by the 15 digit number, the * should still capture only the first 4 digits? Thanks for the help! –  goelv Jul 28 '12 at 21:15

It appears to me all you need is everything except the last 15 characters, why use a regular expression for this simple task? We can simply take the portion of the string (if it's a number before, simply convert to a string, do this, then convert back):

>>> a = "3123456789123456" #3 + 15 digit number
>>> (a[:-15], a[-15:])
('3', '123456789123456')
>>> a = "32831123456789123456" #32831 + 15 digit number
>>> (a[:-15], a[-15:])
('32831', '123456789123456')
>>> a = "31123456789123456" #31 + 15 digit number
>>> (a[:-15], a[-15:])
('31', '123456789123456')

Nice and easy.

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To clarify, I'm using RegEx in Django within the urlconf. –  goelv Jul 28 '12 at 21:05
1  
@goelv I see, in that case, you would be better off following Mark Byer's answer. I would note that things like that might be worth mentioning in a question. –  Lattyware Jul 28 '12 at 21:07
1  
Any particular reason I got -1ed for this one? It's not usable for the OP given hidden requirements, but it is an (and I would argue the best) answer for the question stated. –  Lattyware Jul 28 '12 at 21:10
1  
Sorry for the confusion. I'll be sure to include that in the future. –  goelv Jul 28 '12 at 21:16
    
+1 from me. Given what the OP originally stated, this is a good suggestion. –  Mark Byers Jul 28 '12 at 21:20

Try this regular expression:

^(\d+)(\d{15})$

Explanation:

^      Start of string
$      End of string
\d     Any digit
{15}   Repeat 15 times
+      Repeat one or more times.
(...)  Capturing group
share|improve this answer
    
To clarify, there's no + sign. It's just a string of numbers. Would your solution still work? –  goelv Jul 28 '12 at 20:58
    
@Ωmega The OP never mentions letters being involved. –  Lattyware Jul 28 '12 at 21:01
1  
the + sign in a regular expression means "one or more instances of" –  gnr Jul 28 '12 at 21:03
    
@Ωmega He describes the format as a number of unspecified length followed by a 15 digit number - that's pretty clear. Only numbers are involved. –  Lattyware Jul 28 '12 at 21:05
    
@Lattyware - What if there is just 15 digits total? –  Ωmega Jul 28 '12 at 21:07

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