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Guys my question is very simple but I am confused about the theory behind it. It would be lovely if someone can clarify.

I want to pass a dynamic array of a certain type of variable and have a function convert that type of variable to another one and do more work on it before returning it in the form of a variable array of that new variable.

Here's my not so functional code to show you what I was doing

#include <stdio.h>

//takes in unsigned char array, and returns unsigned short array

unsigned short foo( unsigned char *array, int size) 
{
    int i;
    unsigned short *LeArray = NULL;
    LeArray = (unsigned short*) malloc(size*sizeof(unsigned short));
    for ( i = 0; i < size; ++i ) &LeArray[i] = (unsigned char)&array[i];
    //do more stuff to that array here before returning it
    return *LeArray;

}
int main()
{

    int i, ArraySize;
    unsigned char *before = NULL;
    unsigned short *after = NULL;
    ArraySize = 9;
    before = (unsigned char*) malloc(ArraySize*sizeof(unsigned char));
    for(i = 0; i<ArraySize; i++) before[i] = i+5; //to get some values in
    for (i = 0 ; i<ArraySize; i++) printf("\npre:%d\n",before[i]);
    after = foo( before, ArraySize ); 
    for (i = 0 ; i<ArraySize; i++) printf("\npost:%d\n",after[i]);
    return 0;

}

Any help tips hints or explanations would be of great help to me!! Thanks so much!!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a function with all the strange places fixed to do what you expect it to do:

unsigned short* foo( unsigned char *array, int size) 
// notice the return type - it's a pointer
{
    int i;
    unsigned short *LeArray = NULL;
    LeArray = (unsigned short*) malloc(size*sizeof(unsigned short));
    for ( i = 0; i < size; ++i ) LeArray[i] = (unsigned short)(array[i]);
    //do more stuff to that array here before returning it
    return LeArray; // notice NO DEREFERENCING here
}

Basically here are the issues you had:

  • Return type of the function was not a pointer (was not an array)
  • There was a strange pointer acrobatics you were doing (I would guess you were changing the code around until compiler stopped complaining)
  • You dereferenced a pointer on return, essentially returning a value of the first element of the array (and not the whole array, as intended)

There's more to it, of course. namely:

  • Looks like your "in" array is not changing - it's a very good practice to express that in the function's signature as const unsigned char* array
  • You can further change the interface of your function to get an input argument for the resulting array

In that case you do the following:

void foo(const unsigned char *array, unsigned short* LeArray, int size) 
{
    int i;
    // no malloc as the LeArray is passed-in
    for ( i = 0; i < size; ++i ) LeArray[i] = (unsigned short)(array[i]);
    //do more stuff to that array here before returning it
    return; // void return
}

Of course that assumes the array was pre-created in the calling function

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1  
Thank you for your time and effort :) I guess I don't understand that dereferencing operator too well, I'll learn that for the future –  Ryan Jul 28 '12 at 22:34

You are almost there.

But you should return LeArray itself (which is the address in memory), and not *LeArray (which is the first element).

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thank you I'll keep that lesson in my head –  Ryan Jul 28 '12 at 22:32

after = foo( before, ArraySize ); - Here you are calling the function foo and expecting a return value of type unsigned short *, but the function foo is returning unsigned short value. After that you are accessing the pointer to unsigned short variable after inside main function, which may leads to crash (an unexpected behaviour).

So change your function prototype as unsigned short* foo( unsigned char *array, int size) and do return LeArray;

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